JCR Authors in the News

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Story ImageThe Washington Post
A MAD Magazine Cartoonist Shows How Growing up Poor Sparks Creativity
September 7, 2016

In a recent Journal of Consumer Research study, Meng Zhu and Ravi Mehta wrote: “Contrary to popular belief, abundant resources may have a negative effect on creativity.” They continued: “We found that scarcity forces consumers to think beyond the traditional function of a given product and enhances creativity.”

Creating When You Have Less: The Impact of Resource Scarcity on Product Use Creativity
by Ravi Mehta, Meng Zhu
Story ImageBroadly
Machismo Is Ruining the Planet, Study Says
September 2, 2016

According to a new study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, green behaviors like recycling and carpooling are considered "feminine," and therefore fewer men are interested in saving the planet than women. One way to fix this, the study's authors suggest, is for policymakers and marketers to make the branding messages of green products and behaviors more macho.

Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
by Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Story ImageQuartz
Studies Show People Think Caring About the Environment Is "Feminine"
September 2, 2016

According to new research published in the Journal of Consumer Research, people perceive consumers who behave in eco-friendly ways as “more feminine,” and that those consumers “perceive themselves as more feminine.” What’s more, men may avoid green behaviors in order to protect their masculinity.

Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
by Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Story ImageBoston Globe
Tough Times for Health Insurance
September 2, 2016

In a new study forthcoming in the Journal of Consumer Research, when asked to think pessimistically about the economy, people who grew up poor became significantly less interested in having insurance coverage than people who grew up rich. However, when people were explicitly given information about the probability of getting sick, the effect reversed.

Silver Spoons and Platinum Plans: How Childhood Environment Affects Adult Health Care Decisions
by Chiraag Mittal, Vladas Griskevicius
Story ImageNew York
Men Are Destroying the Earth Because They Think Environmentalism Is Too Girly
September 1, 2016

In a new study, researchers found that men are less likely to buy environmentally friendly products because they perceive them as too feminine. The study, published in the Journal of Consumer Research, found that “greenness” is equated in both men’s and women’s minds with femininity.

Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
by Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Story ImageThe Washington Post
Your Manliness Could Be Hurting the Planet
August 31, 2016

Women tend to beat men on environmental metrics. They generally use less fuel and energy. They eat less meat. They're more concerned about climate change. "Men’s resistance may stem in part from a prevalent association between the concepts of greenness and femininity and a corresponding stereotype (held by both men and women) that green consumers are feminine," writes James Wilkie, a business professor at the University of Notre Dame, this month in the Journal of Consumer Research. "As a result of this stereotype, men may be motivated to avoid or even oppose green behaviors in order to safeguard their gender identity."

Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
by Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Story ImageThe Independent
Ignore Office Dress Code and Wear Casual Clothes for Job Success, Study Suggests
August 27, 2016

Wearing casual clothes and flouting the office dress code could make you seem more competent, a Harvard study suggests. Called the "red sneaker effect," intentionally standing out from the crowd could send a positive message of status, confidence and power, according to the study published in the Journal of Consumer Research.

The Red Sneakers Effect: Inferring Status and Competence from Signals of Nonconformity
by Silvia Bellezza, Francesca Gino, Anat Keinan
Story ImageSlate
Eco-Friendly Branding Must Be Super Manly to Attract Manly Men, Study Says
August 26, 2016

Men are more likely to buy eco-friendly products and donate to environmental charities if the branding strokes their fragile masculine egos, according to new research in the Journal of Consumer Research. A series of seven studies from researchers at universities in the U.S. and China show that people link “greenness” to femininity, making men less likely to engage in behaviors that might support the health of the planet they too must inhabit.

Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
by Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Story ImageThe Globe and Mail
Why a Latte Tastes Better When You Pay with Cash
August 25, 2016

Cash, cheque, debit or credit –- they all affect how much connection, or lack thereof, we feel toward our purchases, according to Dr. Shah, an assistant professor of marketing at the University of Toronto. In a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, she and her fellow researchers found consumers tend to place higher value on products or services when they pay for them using cash. Conversely, with a debit or credit card, or some other automatic form of payment, our sense of connection lessens.

'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
by Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Story ImageAssociation for Psychological Science
Dressing for Success: From Lucky Socks to the Red Sneaker Effect
August 23, 2016

Under most circumstances, not conforming to etiquette rules tends to garner social disapproval; showing up to a business lunch in your gym clothes, for example, is not likely to impress your clients. However, Harvard psychological scientists Silvia Bellezza, Francesca Gino, and Anat Keinan hypothesized in a Journal of Consumer Research article that intentionally standing out from the crowd could also send a positive message conveying status, confidence, and power.

The Red Sneakers Effect: Inferring Status and Competence from Signals of Nonconformity
by Silvia Bellezza, Francesca Gino, Anat Keinan
Story ImageOUPblog
Can We Encourage Healthier Choices by the Way We Display Food Options?
August 22, 2016

When a healthy and an unhealthy item are organized laterally, there is greater preference for the healthy option when it is displayed to the left (vs. right) of the unhealthy option. Why does this happen? Consumers’ natural tendency is to mentally organize healthy items (grilled chicken) to the left of unhealthy items (fried chicken). Hence, a food display that is congruent with this natural mental representation facilitates information processing, which in turn enhances self-control, and ultimately leads to relatively higher likelihood of choosing healthy options.

Healthy-Left, Unhealthy-Right: Can Displaying Healthy Items to the Left (versus Right) of Unhealthy Items Nudge Healthier Choices?
by Marisabel Romero, Dipayan Biswas
Story ImagePsychology Today
Who Deserves the Right to Choose Green?
August 16, 2016

Fair treatment, a foundation of environmental justice, means that poor people living in perilous zones should be free to make decisions that affect their well-being. However, researchers found that the participants in their Journal of Consumer Research study were not so sure. When it comes to spending money on climate-friendly options, those who earned their income, as opposed to receiving welfare, were deemed more deserving of the right to spend extra cash to cool the planet.

Wealth and Welfare: Divergent Moral Reactions to Ethical Consumer Choices
by Jenny G. Olson, Brent McFerran, Andrea C. Morales, Darren W. Dahl
Story ImageFast Company
Four Things to Do outside the Office to Boost Your Creativity
August 16, 2016

In a Journal of Consumer Research study that sounds like it came from Goldilocks and the Three Bears, researchers held brainstorming experiments in three environments to measure the impact of noise on creativity. Participants worked in near silent environments that registered about 50 decibels, loud environments at 85 decibels, and medium-noise environments at 70 decibels. The midrange spot -- about the noise level of a coffee shop -- turned out to be just right when it came to doing creative work.

Is Noise Always Bad? Exploring the Effects of Ambient Noise on Creative Cognition
by Ravi Mehta, Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Amar Cheema
Story ImagePacific Standard
It’s Not Easy Being Green  --  and Manly
August 16, 2016

Men are less likely than women to think and act in Earth-friendly ways. The mental association of caring for the Earth with femininity can “motivate men to avoid green behaviors in order to preserve a macho image,” write researchers in the Journal of Consumer Research. But their findings suggest there are effective ways to defuse this dynamic. They offer evidence that “men’s inhibitions about engaging in green behavior can be mitigated through masculine affirmation and masculine branding.”

Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
by Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Story ImageWall Street Journal
For a Relaxing Vacation, Look to the Data
August 5, 2016

In a series of six experiments published earlier this year in the Journal of Consumer Research, researchers found that activities like reading, coloring or walking can feel more like work when tracked. In one study, researchers asked 105 university students to color shapes for 10 minutes; one group’s coloring was quantified, the other’s wasn’t. The group whose output was measured produced more but rated the activity as less enjoyable than those who weren’t tracked.

The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
by Jordan Etkin
Story ImageThe Washington Post
Men Can’t Compromise without Women Around
August 2, 2016

Researchers who published their findings in the Journal of Consumer Research recruited college students with course credit and asked them to pick a grill. The students' gender, they found, appeared to influence their willingness to compromise with each other on which grill to select. The female and gender-mixed groups generally found a compromise with their partner. Roughly 70 percent agreed to sacrifice their first choice to better meet their partner’s needs.

Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
by Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Story ImageDaily Mail
Women Really Do Get the Better Deal: Couples Are More Likely to Receive a Discount if One of Them Is Female
July 29, 2016

Whether it is a married couple choosing a new car or business colleagues investing in stocks and shares, if one of the two is a woman then the pair will take fewer risks. This means if you want a good deal, you should make sure there's a woman in the negotiations. A compromise is more likely when a woman is involved in the decision making, according to a new study published in the Journal of Consumer Research.

Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
by Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Story ImageThe Telegraph
Want a Good Deal? Get a Woman to Negotiate
July 29, 2016

A satisfactory compromise is more likely when a female is central to the decision-making, claims a study published to the Journal of Consumer Research. Whether it is a married couple choosing a new car, two friends booking a holiday or business colleagues investing in stocks and shares, if one is of the fairer sex, they will take fewer risks. But if when an all-male group tries to negotiate, chances are the offers will be too high or too low.

Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
by Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Story ImageTIME
Want to Reach a Compromise? Add a Woman to the Conversation
July 29, 2016

According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, when two men work together to reach some decision, they’re more likely to reach an all-or-nothing outcome than if they were working alone or with a woman. The researchers found that when two women work together, they’re more likely to reach compromise.

Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
by Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Story ImageForbes
Study: Paying Cash Is Painful and Makes You Value Your Purchase More
July 28, 2016

In a series of different experiments, researchers demonstrated that the more pain we go through, the more we value what we buy. Different means of payment can actually trigger different levels of discomfort. Cash is the most uncomfortable, followed by checks, which require us to write down the amount and remember it. Credit and debit cards hurt the least.

'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
by Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Story ImageTIME
Here's the Unexpected Way Gender Impacts Negotiation
July 27, 2016

According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, negotiations between men often turn into power struggles, with both sides apt to stake out an extreme position. This is true even if both men have the same ostensible goal, the researchers found. This one-upmanship does not hold if a man is negotiating with a woman, nor is it how women negotiate with one another. If negotiating groups include one or more women, the tendency is to move to a middle ground or consensus decision.

Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
by Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Story ImageBig Think
Weird Weather Behavior: Winter Makes Us Love, Summer Makes Us Violent
July 26, 2016

In a 2012 study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, researchers gave 53 male and female graduate students either hot or iced tea and asked them to fill out a survey about movie preferences. The students overwhelmingly chose romantic movies when holding cold drinks. They didn’t express a preference for any other film genre. A few didn’t prefer romantic movies when holding their cold drink, but that was most likely because they didn’t associate romantic movies with warm fuzzy feelings at all.

Warm It Up With Love: The Effect of Physical Coldness on Liking of Romance Movies
by Jiewen Hong, Yacheng Sun
Story ImagePsychology Today
Specific Commitments Can Change Behavior
July 26, 2016

In a 2012 paper published in the Journal of Consumer Research, researchers focused on energy-saving behavior by hotel guests. At check-in, guests at an Orange County, CA hotel were given either a general message about the importance of saving energy or a specific message asking them to hang their towels for re-use to save water and energy.

Commitment and Behavior Change: Evidence From the Field
by Katie Baca-Motes, Amber Brown, Ayelet Gneezy, Elizabeth A. Keenan, Leif D. Nelson
Story ImageTIME
Why Changing Attitudes toward Cash Could Hurt Us in the Long Run
July 26, 2016

Researchers published in the Journal of Consumer Research recently concluded that people assign greater value to things they purchase with cash. They showed that those who donated to a charity by check, not credit card, were more likely to donate again. They also showed that those who bought a $2 mug with cash demanded 75% more than those who paid with plastic, if they were to resell the mug.

'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
by Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Story ImageForbes
Pokemon Not a Go for Some Consumers, says Nielsen Games Report
July 23, 2016

Researchers posit that people can superimpose their moral beliefs on certain products, creating an us-versus-them narrative, as a way to reinforce their own values and identities. The study, published in the Journal of Consumer Research, concludes that ”evoking the morality play myth produces identities that are dialectically linked and animated by adversarial relations among ideologically opposed consumers. Through this play of moral protagonism, consumers imbue their consumption practices and identity-relevant brands with sacralized meanings ... and existentially anchor their consumer identities in a system of ideological beliefs that are mythically canonized as being inherently virtuous.”

Consumer Identity Work as Moral Protagonism: How Myth and Ideology Animate a Brand-Mediated Moral Conflict
by Marius K. Luedicke, Craig J. Thompson, Markus Giesler
Story ImageBoston Globe
Why Paying in Cash Connects Us to Products
July 18, 2016

Paying by cash or check increases the value of the purchase to the consumer, according to a study published earlier this year in the Journal of Consumer Research. Paper payment can even lead a person to feel more loyal to a brand or more likely to repeat a donation to a charity.

'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
by Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Story ImageNew York Times
Paying with Cash Hurts. That's Also Why It Feels So Good.
July 16, 2016

Paying with cash is painful -- and that’s a good thing, according to new research published in the Journal of Consumer Research. When people pay for items using cold, hard cash rather than by card or online, they feel more of a sting and therefore assign more value to the purchase.

'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
by Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Story ImageThe Independent
What Your Mindless Daily Habits Reveal about You, According to Science
July 9, 2016

A series of experiments published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that explanation fiends score high on measures of cognitive reflection, meaning they analyze information to death and prefer lots of detail about products. Explanation foes, on the other hand, score low on measures of cognitive reflection, meaning they don't do well with so many details and prefer more general information.

Explanation Fiends and Foes: How Mechanistic Detail Determines Understanding and Preference
by Philip M. Fernbach, Steven A. Sloman, Robert St. Louis, Julia N. Shube
Story ImageHarvard Business Review
High Online User Ratings Don’t Actually Mean You’re Getting a Quality Product
July 4, 2016

Online user ratings and reviews are now one of the most important sources of product quality information. Consumers love them because they are free, widely available, easy to access, and ostensibly objective. But the trust we place in star ratings reflects an illusion of validity; we trust them much more than we should.

Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
by Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Story ImageInverse
No, Netflix Doesn't Make You Hate Commercials More
June 30, 2016

A paper published in the Journal of Consumer Research essentially flipped the script on the traditional television-watching experience: Instead of studying people watching commercials, they studied how the commercials affected how the people felt about the actual show. Regardless of what the commercial was about or how well it was made, commercial interruption actually intensified the enjoyment of watching the show.

Enhancing the Television-Viewing Experience through Commercial Interruptions
by Leif D. Nelson, Tom Meyvis, Jeff Galak
Browse and Search the Publicity Archive »
DateNews ItemArticle Mentioned
Sep 20What Business Owners Can Learn from Apple’s Store Makeover
NCR Silver
Turning to Space: Social Density, Social Class, and the Value of Things in Stores
Thomas Clayton O’Guinn, Robin J. Tanner, Ahreum Maeng
Sep 15Tailgating Season Is upon Us
South Bend Tribune
Domesticating Public Space through Ritual: Tailgating as Vestaval
Tonya Williams Bradford, John F. Sherry Jr.
Sep 14Are EVs Not Manly Enough?
Hybrid Cars News
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 12How Framing Sustainability as Strength Can Help Win Male Audiences
Sustainable Brands
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 9Eight Proven Strategies for Better Remote Work
Lifehacker Australia
Is Noise Always Bad? Exploring the Effects of Ambient Noise on Creative Cognition
Ravi Mehta, Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Amar Cheema
Sep 9UM Professor's Research Published in Journal of Consumer Research
University of Mississippi News
Effects of Objective and Evaluative Front-of-Package Cues on Food Evaluation and Choice: The Moderating Influence of Comparative and Noncomparative Processing Contexts
Christopher L. Newman, Elizabeth Howlett, Scot Burton
Sep 7Bill Nye's New Show and Other Sources of Nostalgia
The Manitoban
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Sep 7Alone Doesn't Always Mean Lonely
The State Press
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Sep 6Survey Shows Men Find Environmentalism 'UnManly'
teleSUR English
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 6En Magasin, Méfiez-Vous du Centre
Le Journal de Montréal
Shining in the Center: Central Gaze Cascade Effect on Product Choice
A. Selin Atalay, H. Onur Bodur, Dina Rasolofoarison
Sep 6Men Avoid 'Green Behaviors' to Preserve Their Macho Image
Treehugger
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 4Men Think Going Green Will Make Them Wimps
Newser
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 4Commentary: Research Shows Recycling's Not Very Manly
Portland Press Herald
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 2Paint Nude Women on Solar Panels: How to Get Men to Care about the Environment
ABC (Australia)
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 1Recycling's Not Just for Women, Bro
TakePart
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 1Men Are Ruining the Planet Because They Think Green Products Are "Feminine"
Mic
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 1Easy Ways to Lose Weight without Even Trying: Clench Your Fists
NewsOK.com
From Firm Muscles to Firm Willpower: Understanding the Role of Embodied Cognition in Self-Regulation
Iris W. Hung, Aparna A. Labroo
Sep 1Recycling’s Not Just for Women, Bro
Yahoo! News
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Aug 31Men Willing to Purchase Eco-Friendly Things If Products Are 'Masculine'
Siasat Daily
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Aug 31Study: Men Litter More, Recycle Less to 'Safeguard Their Gender Identity'
Waste Dive
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Aug 28From Snack Tactics to Slowing Down: The Best Tips to Stop Overeating
Daily Express
From Firm Muscles to Firm Willpower: Understanding the Role of Embodied Cognition in Self-Regulation
Iris W. Hung, Aparna A. Labroo
Aug 28It's Not Easy Being Green -- At Least for Men
Psych Central
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Aug 26Why We're Happier When We're Older
Mother Nature Network
Happiness from Ordinary and Extraordinary Experiences
Amit Bhattacharjee, Cassie Mogilner
Aug 26What Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and Gaming Mean for Reward Marketing
MarketingProfs
From Inherent Value to Incentive Value: When and Why Pointless Effort Enhances Consumer Preference
Sara Kim, Aparna A. Labroo
Aug 26Men Willing to Go Green If Products Are 'Masculine'
Business Standard
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Aug 25Going Green Is for Girls — But Branding Can Make Men Eco-friendly
Notre Dame News
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Aug 25Going Green Is for Girls, but Branding Can Make Men Eco-friendly
Science Daily
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Aug 20Is Compromise More Likely When Women Are Part of the Decision?
Salt Lake Tribune
Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Aug 19Is Compromise More Likely When Women Are Part of the Decision?
HealthDay
Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Aug 17Can Music Affect Your Appetite?
The Irish Times
The Influence of Background Music on the Behavior of Restaurant Patrons
Ronald E. Milliman
Aug 9Art of the Deal
Boston College
Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Aug 8More Women Lawyers, Less Litigation?
Lawyers Weekly
Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Aug 4Why Facts Don't Matter to Trump's Supporters
The Washington Post
How Warnings about False Claims Become Recommendations
Ian Skurnik, Carolyn Yoon, Denise C. Park, Norbert Schwarz
Aug 3Raising Nonmaterialistic Kids. Is it Possible?
The Huffington Post UK
Material Parenting: How the Use of Goods in Parenting Fosters Materialism in the Next Generation
Marsha L. Richins, Lan Nguyen Chaplin
Aug 2Men Can't Compromise without Women Around, Study Finds
The Houston Chronicle
Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Aug 1Dieting in General Can Make You Angry
Organic Authority
Coping and Construal Level Matching Drives Health Message Effectiveness via Response Efficacy or Self-Efficacy Enhancement
Dahee Han, Adam Duhachek, Nidhi Agrawal
Jul 30Why Many Men Have Difficulty Compromising
Psych Central
Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Jul 30Blasts from the Past: Collecting Retro Video Games in the UAE
The National
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Jul 28Compromise Nearly Guaranteed When a Woman Is Involved in Decision-Making Pairs
EurekAlert!
Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Jul 285 Surprising Reasons You’re Suddenly Broke
Men's Health
Environmental Disorder Leads to Self-Regulatory Failure
Boyoun (Grace) Chae, Rui (Juliet) Zhu
Jul 27The Crazy Reason a Dentist Is Suing His Patients
TIME
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Jul 22Paying with Cash Makes It Less Likely for You to Regret Your Shopping Choices
Yahoo! Parenting
'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Jul 21Is It Easier to Save Money When You Pay with Cash?
ConsumerAffairs.com
'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Jul 205 Simple Tips to Make Your Marketplace as Cool as a Cucumber
Yahoo! Singapore
What Makes Things Cool? How Autonomy Influences Perceived Coolness
Caleb Warren, Margaret C. Campbell
Jul 20You'll Love Your Stuff More If You Pay For It with Cash, Study Says
Yahoo! Beauty
'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Jul 19You’d Value Your Car More If You Paid Cash For It
TheTruthAboutCars.com
'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Jul 19Plate Colour Influences How Much You Eat
IOL Lifestyle
Plate Size and Color Suggestibility: The Delboeuf Illusion’s Bias on Serving and Eating Behavior
Koert Van Ittersum, Brian Wansink
Jul 19Paying in Cash Makes Purchases More Meaningful
WomansDay.com
'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Jul 18Is Paying With Cash More ‘Painful?’
PYMNTS.com
'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Jul 13Not All 'Front-of-Package' Nutrition Information Produces the Same Effect
Science Daily
Effects of Objective and Evaluative Front-of-Package Cues on Food Evaluation and Choice: The Moderating Influence of Comparative and Noncomparative Processing Contexts
Christopher L. Newman, Elizabeth Howlett, Scot Burton
Jul 12Not All ‘Front-of-Package’ Nutrition Information Produces the Same Effect
Newswise
Effects of Objective and Evaluative Front-of-Package Cues on Food Evaluation and Choice: The Moderating Influence of Comparative and Noncomparative Processing Contexts
Christopher L. Newman, Elizabeth Howlett, Scot Burton
Jul 125 Ways Music Makes You Happy
The Alternative Daily
Interpersonal Relationships and Preferences for Mood-Congruency in Aesthetic Experiences
Chan Jean Lee, Eduardo B. Andrade, Stephen E. Palmer
Jul 12Not All 'Front-of-Package' Nutrition Information Produces the Same Effect
MedicalXpress.com
Effects of Objective and Evaluative Front-of-Package Cues on Food Evaluation and Choice: The Moderating Influence of Comparative and Noncomparative Processing Contexts
Christopher L. Newman, Elizabeth Howlett, Scot Burton
Jul 10Shoppers, stop: Paying by cash makes you more attached to what you buy
Hindustan Times
'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Jul 10Paper or Plastic? How We Pay Influences Our Feelings About a Purchase
Psych Central
'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Jun 30Paper or Plastic? The Way We Pay Influences How Much We Value Our Purchase
Phys.Org
'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Jun 30Paper or plastic? U of T study finds how we pay for things may affect how we feel about them
U of T News
'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Jun 29Should We Trust Online Reviews? New Research Says You Shouldn't
Business2Community
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
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