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Story ImagePsychology Today
Is Choice Overload a Real Thing?
February 5, 2016

Choice overload is the idea that too many choices actually results in making decisions more difficult and less satisfying. In fact, if too many options are presented, people might even avoid making a decision altogether. What a fascinating idea.

Can There Ever Be Too Many Options? A Meta-Analytic Review of Choice Overload
by Benjamin Scheibehenne, Rainer Greifeneder, Peter M. Todd
Story ImageCBC News
Mikael Kingsbury Reveals Secret Weapon behind World Cup Success
February 4, 2016

New research published in the Journal of Consumer Research demonstrates that strong performance brands can cause an effect that is akin to a placebo effect. In this study, participants experienced a noticeable bump in task-specific self-esteem when using high-performance sport brands that claim technical superiority.

Performance Brand Placebos: How Brands Improve Performance and Consumers Take the Credit
by Aaron M. Garvey, Frank Germann, Lisa E. Bolton
Story ImageForbes
How to Boost Your Constructive Criticism Skills
February 2, 2016

Giving feedback is a tricky business. It’s a big part of daily life in any workplace, but it requires a delicate balance between firm criticism and good-natured positivity. A paper in The Journal of Consumer Research finds that when people consider themselves experts on a subject, they’re much more open to receiving negative feedback. They come to regard it as a tool for growth, rather than a stumbling block or a combative interaction.

Tell Me What I Did Wrong: Experts Seek and Respond to Negative Feedback
by Stacey R. Finkelstein, Ayelet Fishbach
Story ImageFast Company Co.Design
Why the Shape of a Company's Logo Matters
February 1, 2016

Think about the iconic brand names you know: Apple, Target, McDonald’s, Gap. What images come to mind? For many of us, probably their logos. That’s because whether it’s an apple or big golden arches, a logo is crucial to a company’s identity. Now, new research says that logos are even more important than businesses and consumers realize.

Does Your Company Have the Right Logo? How and Why Circular and Angular Logo Shapes Influence Brand Attribute Judgments
by Yuwei Jiang, Gerald J. Gorn, Maria Galli, Amitava Chattopadhyay
Story ImageSydney Morning Herald
Why I Broke Up with My Fitbit
January 26, 2016

"Fitbits could ruin your workout," warned London's Daily Telegraph and at least a dozen other newspapers — just in time to derail New Year's resolutions. Turns out that a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research concluded that Fitbits, Jawbones and other fitness trackers might not be all they're cracked up to be.

The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
by Jordan Etkin
Story ImageThe Washington Post
Down with the Tyranny of the Fitbit
January 25, 2016

A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research concludes that Fitbits, Jawbones and other fitness trackers might not be all they’re cracked up to be. Enjoyable activities, like exercise, can become almost like a job, by focusing on the outcomes of things that used to be fun. In other words, tracking all those steps, floors and calories can make working out, even walking, feel like a drag.

The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
by Jordan Etkin
Story ImageLifehack
Science Says What You Wear Largely Affects How You Think and Behave
January 24, 2016

We are all familiar with different social norms and respective dress codes followed by people in certain institutions. For example, when we think of a stock broker, we imagine a man wearing a suit; when we think of a surgeon, we imagine a man in scrubs, etc. However, according to several experiments published in the Journal of Consumer Research, breaking the expected dress code slightly can improve how you are perceived by the crowd.

The Red Sneakers Effect: Inferring Status and Competence from Signals of Nonconformity
by Silvia Bellezza, Francesca Gino, Anat Keinan
Story ImageBoston Globe
Beggars Can't Be Choosers
January 24, 2016

Welfare comes with strings attached — and not just the legal kind. New research suggests that welfare is akin to a social contract — that, in exchange for my hard-earned tax dollars, I expect you to act like a miser. Welfare recipients were judged negatively for paying a premium for organic food or renting a Prius or for simply making donations to charity, whereas an affluent person was judged positively for these very same actions.

Wealth and Welfare: Divergent Moral Reactions to Ethical Consumer Choices
by Jenny G. Olson, Brent Mcferran, Andrea C. Morales, Darren W. Dahl
Story ImageFast Company Co.Design
Proof You Really Will Golf Better With A "Nike" Branded Club
January 22, 2016

Any golfer worth their snuff has, at some point in their life, spent way too much money on name-brand clubs, stepped up to the first tee feeling like a cross of Tiger Woods and Thor, and then promptly shanked their first ball into the forest. But new research in the Journal of Consume Research finds that the halo effect of an elite performance brand can actually affect your athletic performance for the better.

Performance Brand Placebos: How Brands Improve Performance and Consumers Take the Credit
by Aaron M. Garvey, Frank Germann, Lisa E. Bolton
Story ImageBBC News
Why That 'One Diet Trick' Won't Work
January 21, 2016

Counting your steps does get you to walk further, and telling people how many steps they have walked or even how many pages they have read or how many shapes they have coloured in does get people to walk further, read more, and colour in more. But there’s a problem. In a study in the Journal of Consumer Research, students who knew how many steps they had taken walked further, but didn’t enjoy it as much.

The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
by Jordan Etkin
Story ImageNew York
Study Confirms Fitness Trackers Increase Walking, Misery
January 20, 2016

If you want to be more active, fitness trackers can help — but they can also ruin all your fun, according to new research in the Journal of Consumer Research. 100 subjects were given pedometers, some with tape covering the displays. To the shock of no one, more than 70 percent of the people with visible displays checked them regularly, which was both good and bad.

The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
by Jordan Etkin
Story ImageUSA Today
Why That Fitbit Might Not Be So Good for You
January 14, 2016

Conventional thinking goes like this: If we have more information about how many steps we take, how many calories we burn, and how many hours we sleep (or don’t) we can make changes to live happier, healthier lives. However, the “unintended consequences of personal quantification” may decrease our enjoyment in an activity (like walking), which then leads us to do less of it — which is certainly not healthier.

The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
by Jordan Etkin
Story ImageKnowledge@Wharton
Feel the Pain: How Conflict Influences Decision-Making
January 12, 2016

Human beings are tasked with making hundreds of choices and decisions daily. Some are relatively simple — Do I want soup or salad for lunch? Should I wear the white shirt or the blue one? But others are so fraught with complications that decision-making can draw out for many restless days and nights. How does the pain of others struggling with the agony of decision-making influence our own process?

Pain and Preferences: Observed Decisional Conflict and the Convergence of Preferences
by Rom Y. Schrift, Moty Amar
Story ImageInc.
This Small Change Will Skyrocket Your Chances of Achieving Your Goals
January 6, 2016

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research says picking a number goal might backfire. If you set out to lose 30 pounds, you may run out of steam before you reach that goal. And once the motivation starts to decline, your chance of success plummets. If, however, you create a goal range, you'll increase your chances of victory.

The Effect of Goal Specificity on Consumer Goal Reengagement
by Maura L. Scott, Stephen M. Nowlis
Story ImageSmithsonian
How Are Horoscopes Still a Thing?
January 5, 2016

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that people who read a negative horoscope were more likely to indulge in impulsive or self-indulgent behavior soon after. So what’s going on? Why are people willing to re-order their love lives, buy a lottery ticket, or a take a new job based on the advice of someone who knows nothing more about them than their birthdate?

The Interactive Effect of Beliefs in Malleable Fate and Fateful Predictions on Choice
by Hyeongmin (Christian) Kim, Katina Kulow, Thomas Kramer
Story ImagePacific Standard
Why 'Star Wars' Won't Win the Best Picture Oscar
December 29, 2015

New research in the Journal of Consumer Research suggests that, when judging whether a creative work is worthy of recognition, we take into account such factors as authenticity and creative control—that is, whether the song, film, or symphony is the untampered-with expression of one artist's vision.

What Wins Awards Is Not Always What I Buy: How Creative Control Affects Authenticity and Thus Recognition (But Not Liking)
by Francesca Valsesia, Joseph C. Nunes, Andrea Ordanini
Story ImageYahoo! News
How Fitness Trackers Might Make Us Hate Fitness
December 28, 2015

Fitness trackers are supposed to motivate us to get out and there do fitness things. But for some of us, being monitored by those little wristbands can make exercise less enjoyable. And a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research could help explain why.

The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
by Jordan Etkin
Story ImageThe Hindu
Secret Sauce of Star Wars Lies Deep in Your Brain
December 26, 2015

There is empirical evidence that nostalgia makes people lax with money (explaining why grown men buy appropriately labelled fluorescent plastic tubes knowing fully well that they aren’t light sabres). Also, consumers asked to think about the past were willing to pay more for a set of products than consumers asked to think about new memories or future scenarios.

Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
by Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Story ImageWall Street Journal
A Policy of Saying 'No' Can Save You Time and Guilt
December 23, 2015

Research shows that personal policies are also helpful in reaching personal goals, like losing weight —- but the wording is important. According to a series of experiments published in the Journal of Consumer Research, telling yourself “I don’t skip the gym” versus “I can’t skip the gym,” for example, can help motivation.

“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
by Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Story ImageNPR
What Drives The Holiday Spirit? A Christmas Investigation
December 22, 2015

When choosing gifts, we often lean toward impressive and desirable. Think the latest video game (regardless of difficult it is to play) or a gift certificate to a fancy restaurant an hour away. But researchers found receivers are not so willing to trade off feasibility for desirability, and sticking to, say, movie tickets closer to home might make a better gift.

Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
by Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Story ImageThe Telegraph
Fitbits Could Ruin Your Workout, Claim Experts
December 22, 2015

They are set to be one of the most popular gifts this Christmas, but gadgets like Fitbits might actually be ruining your workout. Counting the miles you have run and the calories you have burned makes hitting the gym feel like you are at work -- instead of something you enjoy.

The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
by Jordan Etkin
Story ImageNew York
Fitness Trackers Mostly Just Remind You That Working Out Is Not That Fun
December 21, 2015

Once the hangover wears off, many people will greet the New Year by putting their long-neglected fitness trackers back on, with high-minded goals of becoming fitter and healthier by accounting for every step taken and every calorie torched. But some new research points to an overlooked downside to using a Fitbit or an Apple Watch: They serve to remind the user that working out is kind of a chore.

The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
by Jordan Etkin
Story ImageCityLab
When Does Wearing a Fitness Tracker Do More Harm Than Good?
December 21, 2015

Tracking activities can actually make us enjoy them less. When we know that our walking habits are being recorded, for instance, we’re more likely to walk, but we also take less pleasure in strolling. It’s because the act of measuring the output makes enjoyable activities feel more like work, which reduces their enjoyment.

The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
by Jordan Etkin
Story ImageScientific American
Dress for Success: How Clothes Influence Our Performance
December 17, 2015

An article in the Journal of Consumer Research explored observers' reactions to people who broke established norms only slightly. The results suggest that people judge these slight deviations from the norm as positive because they suggest that the individual is powerful enough to risk the social costs of such behaviors.

The Red Sneakers Effect: Inferring Status and Competence from Signals of Nonconformity
by Silvia Bellezza, Francesca Gino, Anat Keinan
Story ImagePacific Standard
What's the Correct Way to Give Gifts?
December 16, 2015

Oftentimes when gift givers go above and beyond, they're not actually paying attention to what the receiver wants, and wind up giving less good gifts. So when givers try to give a gift that's seemingly better, what they wind up doing is overrating something. The receivers, if they are asked, prefer something that is feasible and practical.

Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
by Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Story ImageThe Huffington Post
5 Scientifically Proven Ways To Make Your Gifts Meaningful
December 14, 2015

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that gift givers focus too much on the desirability of potential gifts and not enough on how the recipient might use those gifts. Gift-giving participants tended to choose gifts that were desirable but impractical rather than those that were more practical but less desirable. But the participants who were receiving the gifts actually preferred the more practical option.

Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
by Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Story ImageMarketingProfs
Five Researched Trends about Data-Based Storytelling
December 11, 2015

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that people who experience fear while they watch a movie also feel affiliation toward a brand present at hand. Fear is a more powerful trigger for brand loyalty since it's an experience one needs to share. Sharing fear with friends reduces the pressure inflicted by the emotion, but when no human companionship is available, even an abstract brand will do.

The Impact of Fear on Emotional Brand Attachment
by Lea Dunn, JoAndrea Hoegg
Story ImageKnowledge@Wharton
The Sharing Economy: A New Way of Doing Business
December 11, 2015

According to research published in the Journal of Consumer Research, users of Zipcar don’t feel any of the reciprocal obligations that arise when sharing with one another. They experience Zipcar in the anonymous way one experiences a hotel; they know others have used the cars, but have no desire to interact with them.

Access-Based Consumption: The Case of Car Sharing
by Fleura Bardhi, Giana M. Eckhardt
Story ImageThe Good Men Project
Could the Hunger Games Turn Your Teen into a Revolutionary?
December 6, 2015

The extent to which a reader loses herself in a story is a major cause of the extent to which her attitudes change. Many young adult dystopian stories tackle themes such as oppression, poverty, starvation, and war, among others. Relating to the story characters allows teens to explore and learn to care about these issues.

The Extended Transportation-Imagery Model: A Meta-Analysis of the Antecedents and Consequences of Consumers’ Narrative Transportation
by Tom van Laer, Ko de Ruyter, Luca M. Visconti, Martin Wetzels
Story ImageWomen's Wear Daily
The Continuing Story of West Chelsea's Story Boutique
December 5, 2015

Story uses Perch-enabled displays, which offer shoppers a digital reaction at the point of contact and track when shoppers approach a display and interact with products, using cloud-based analytics to measure shopping behavior. Touching a product makes shoppers about 50 percent more likely to buy it, according to the Journal of Consumer Research.

The Effect of Mere Touch on Perceived Ownership
by Joann Peck, Suzanne B. Shu
Story ImageNew York
Why Even Experts Fall for Art Forgery
December 4, 2015

A paper published in the Journal of Consumer Research showed that too much expertise can negatively impact a person’s judgment when it comes to comparing two products. There is a blanket assumption that knowledge and expertise are always good. But that's not always true.

Knowing Too Much: Expertise-Induced False Recall Effects in Product Comparison
by Ravi Mehta, Joandrea Hoegg and Amitav Chakravarti
Story ImageLive Science
5 Scientifically Proven Ways to Make Your Gifts Meaningful
December 4, 2015

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that gift givers focus too much on the desirability of potential gifts and not enough on how the recipient might use those gifts. In other words, gift givers shouldn't choose presents based on what they would like to give but rather on what the recipient would really want to receive.

Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
by Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Story ImageLifehacker
How to Break Your Netflix Binge-Watching Habit
December 1, 2015

You binge-watch a show because you enjoy it, but what if there was a way you could enjoy it even more? According to a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, the faster you consume media like TV shows the less joy you actually get out of them. You become bored with the show and miss out on the subtle nuances that make it so great.

Slow Down! Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Avoidable Satiation
by Jeff Galak, Justin Kruger, George Loewenstein
Story ImageWall Street Journal
Five Ways to Give Better Gifts (Backed by Science)
November 30, 2015

How often do you give someone a big, generous gift and add on a small extra (say a cute pen or $5 Starbucks card) for fun? It turns out the little stocking stuffer is actually detracting from appreciation of the gift overall. In a series of experiments, researchers discovered that recipients subconsciously average the values of the individual components when forming an impression of the bundle overall.

The Presenter's Paradox
by Kimberlee Weaver, Stephen M. Garcia, Norbert Schwartz
Story ImageNPR
How to Survive (and Maybe Even Enjoy) Thanksgiving Dinner
November 24, 2015

For many of us, Thanksgiving is about resisting temptation. So how can we do it better? A paper published in the Journal of Consumer Research suggests one secret might be a simple language trick: We should shift from saying "I can't" to saying "I don't."

“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
by Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Story ImageThe Huffington Post
How to Avoid Those Awkward Moments Around the Dinner Table
November 19, 2015

If you cannot keep your guests away from hot button topics, you may want to consider a scientifically proven strategy for keeping the peace: use round tables. People seated at a round table - as opposed to a rectangular or square one - get along better and are less likely to bicker.

Exploring the Impact of Various Shaped Seating Arrangements on Persuasion
by Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Jennifer J. Argo
Story ImageForbes
Study: The More Stuff We Have, The Less Creative We Are
November 19, 2015

Intuitively it seems like the more resources we have available to us, the more tools and opportunities we have to stretch our creative wings. Not so, claims the results of a new study – it’s scarcity, not abundance, that promotes creativity. The more stuff we have, the less creative we are.

Creating When You Have Less: The Impact of Resource Scarcity on Product Use Creativity
by Ravi Mehta, Meng Zhu
Story ImageNew York
Birchbox Has Succeeded Because Lots of People Really Hate Making Choices
November 11, 2015

Attempts to replicate studies that claimed evidence for the paralysis that comes from too many options have often come up short and a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research found evidence of “single option aversion” — that is, the idea that people like to have some choices about what they’re purchasing.

Single-Option Aversion
by Daniel Mochon
Browse and Search the Publicity Archive »
Press Releases »
DateNews ItemArticle Mentioned
Feb 8What does your logo say about your business?
RealtyBizNews
Does Your Company Have the Right Logo? How and Why Circular and Angular Logo Shapes Influence Brand Attribute Judgments
Yuwei Jiang, Gerald J. Gorn, Maria Galli, Amitava Chattopadhyay
Feb 8Retail therapy can make you happy only if you do it right
ETRetail.com
Perils of Compensatory Consumption: Within-Domain Compensation Undermines Subsequent Self-Regulation
Monika Lisjak, Andrea Bonezzi, Soo Kim, Derek D. Rucker
Feb 5ASU Professor Studies Whether Shopping Helps After a Setback
Newswise
Perils of Compensatory Consumption: Within-Domain Compensation Undermines Subsequent Self-Regulation
Monika Lisjak, Andrea Bonezzi, Soo Kim, Derek D. Rucker
Feb 5ASU Professor Studies Whether Shopping Helps After a Setback
Newswise
Perils of Compensatory Consumption: Within-Domain Compensation Undermines Subsequent Self-Regulation
Monika Lisjak, Andrea Bonezzi, Soo Kim, Derek D. Rucker
Feb 4When 'retail therapy' makes you feel worse
Arizona State University: ASU Now
Perils of Compensatory Consumption: Within-Domain Compensation Undermines Subsequent Self-Regulation
Monika Lisjak, Andrea Bonezzi, Soo Kim, Derek D. Rucker
Feb 4Your FitBit Might Be Making You A Bit Blue
Grazia
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Feb 2Is frugality in your gene pool?
Newsworks.org
On the Heritability of Consumer Decision Making: An Exploratory Approach for Studying Genetic Effects on Judgment and Choice
Itamar Simonson, Aner Sela
Feb 2How my Fitbit and I came to part ways
Sarasota Herald-Tribune
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Feb 1Habits to help save money, knowing what influences your buying
Fairbanks Daily News-Miner
The Effect of Mere Touch on Perceived Ownership
Joann Peck, Suzanne B. Shu
Jan 31Breakup Songs: Knowing When to Play Sad and Happy Music Can Help the Healing Process
Medical Daily
Interpersonal Relationships and Preferences for Mood-Congruency in Aesthetic Experiences
Chan Jean Lee, Eduardo B. Andrade, Stephen E. Palmer
Jan 29At First I Loved My Fitbit. Then I Hated It.
Hartford Courant
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 28"Noise" Apps Replicate Background Sounds, Increase Productivity Some Claim
Small Business Trends
Is Noise Always Bad? Exploring the Effects of Ambient Noise on Creative Cognition
Ravi Mehta, Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Amar Cheema
Jan 28UAE residents talk about the hangouts that they like best
Khaleej Times
Place Attachment in Commercial Settings: A Gift Economy Perspective
Alain Debenedetti, Harmen Oppewal, Zeynep Arsel
Jan 2821 ways to feel full for longer
CNN
Plate Size and Color Suggestibility: The Delboeuf Illusion’s Bias on Serving and Eating Behavior
Koert Van Ittersum, Brian Wansink
Jan 26Payment methods affect consumers' perceptions of products
Phys.Org
Do Payment Mechanisms Change the Way Consumers Perceive Products?
Promothesh Chatterjee, Randall L. Rose
Jan 26At frst I loved my Fitbit. Then I hated it
The Hamilton Spectator
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 26Why I hate my Fitbit
New Zealand Herald
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 26How fitness trackers can mess with your workouts by making them feel a drag
South China Morning Post
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 24Paying with credit cards can be a bad, unsustainable habit
Portland Press Herald
How Credit Card Payments Increase Unhealthy Food Purchases: Visceral Regulation of Vices
Manoj Thomas, Kalpesh Kaushik Desai, Satheeshkumar Seenivasan
Jan 22Is Frugality in Your Gene Pool?
Women's Voices for Change
On the Heritability of Consumer Decision Making: An Exploratory Approach for Studying Genetic Effects on Judgment and Choice
Itamar Simonson, Aner Sela
Jan 22Your FitBit Might Be Making You A Bit Blue
Grazia Daily UK
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 22Brands with high performance rate can cause placebo effect
Business Standard
Performance Brand Placebos: How Brands Improve Performance and Consumers Take the Credit
Aaron M. Garvey, Frank Germann, Lisa E. Bolton
Jan 22Fitness Trackers Could be Taking the fun out of Workouts: Study
Latinos Health
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 21Head up, heart down: Vertical placement matters
University of Michigan News Service
Positioning Rationality and Emotion: Rationality Is Up and Emotion Is Down
Luca Cian, Aradhna Krishna, Norbert Schwarz
Jan 21Ordering Food From A Tablet Could Lead To Healthier Choices
Ubergizmo
The Effect of Preference Expression Modality on Self-Control
Anne-Kathrin Klesse, Jonathan Levav, Caroline Goukens
Jan 21Fitness Trackers Can Actually Decrease Your Enjoyment in Healthy Activities Like Walking
Madame Noire
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 20Can performance brands cause a placebo effect?
Science Daily
Performance Brand Placebos: How Brands Improve Performance and Consumers Take the Credit
Aaron M. Garvey, Frank Germann, Lisa E. Bolton
Jan 20Can performance brands cause a placebo effect?
Phys.Org
Performance Brand Placebos: How Brands Improve Performance and Consumers Take the Credit
Aaron M. Garvey, Frank Germann, Lisa E. Bolton
Jan 20Head up, heart down -- vertical placement matters
Phys.Org
Positioning Rationality and Emotion: Rationality Is Up and Emotion Is Down
Luca Cian, Aradhna Krishna, Norbert Schwarz
Jan 20Ordering food by iPad leads to healthier choice
MedicalXpress.com
The Effect of Preference Expression Modality on Self-Control
Anne-Kathrin Klesse, Jonathan Levav, Caroline Goukens
Jan 19Materialist Consumers with Poor Personal Relationships Use 'Servant' Brands to Gain Sense of Power: Study
Tech Times
Do Materialists Prefer the “Brand-as-Servant”? The Interactive Effect of Anthropomorphized Brand Roles and Materialism on Consumer Responses
Hyeongmin Christian Kim , Thomas Kramer
Jan 19Why that Fitbit might not be so good for you
13WMAZ
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 17Don't sweat the gizmos and tracking -- just get out, sweat
Fredericksburg.com
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 16Buying a Flat-Screen TV or Thin Laptop Can Convince People They've Lost Weight
Daily Mail
Products as Self-Evaluation Standards: When Owned and Unowned Products have Opposite Effects on Self-Judgment
Liad Weiss, Gita Venkataramani Johar
Jan 16New Year's resolution: Don't sweat the sweat
Waterbury Republican American
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 15New Year's resolution: Don't sweat the sweat
Waterbury Republican American
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 14Feel The Pain: How Conflict Influences Decision-Making
ValueWalk
Pain and Preferences: Observed Decisional Conflict and the Convergence of Preferences
Rom Y. Schrift, Moty Amar
Jan 14Why that Fitbit might not be so good for you
KGW.com NBC Portland
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 14Attention Insurance Marketers: Is Your Brand a 'Servant' or 'Partner' for Consumers?
Insurance Journal
Do Materialists Prefer the “Brand-as-Servant”? The Interactive Effect of Anthropomorphized Brand Roles and Materialism on Consumer Responses
Hyeongmin Christian Kim , Thomas Kramer
Jan 14New Year's resolution: Don't sweat the sweat
Lompoc Record
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 13The Secret To Happiness
Payson Roundup
Happiness from Ordinary and Extraordinary Experiences
Amit Bhattacharjee, Cassie Mogilner
Jan 13Meat Heads: New Study Focuses on How Meat Consumption Alters Men's Self-Perceived Levels of Masculinity
The Huffington Post
Is Meat Male? A Quantitative Multimethod Framework to Establish Metaphoric Relationships
Paul Rozin, Julia M. Hormes, Myles S. Faith, Brian Wansink
Jan 12Defy the norm! Here are 7 tips for continuing your resolutions (after most have given up)
KIVI-TV ABC 6 Idaho
The Progress Bias in Goal Pursuit: When One Step Forward Seems Larger than One Step Back
Margaret C. Campbell, Caleb Warren
Jan 12Defy the norm! Here are 7 tips for continuing your resolutions (after most have given up)
WRTV Indianapolis
The Progress Bias in Goal Pursuit: When One Step Forward Seems Larger than One Step Back
Margaret C. Campbell, Caleb Warren
Jan 12New Year's resolution: Don't sweat the sweat
Albuquerque Journal
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 11New Year's resolution: Don't sweat the sweat
Press of Atlantic City
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 10His resolution? Don't sweat the sweat
The Sun Chronicle
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 9Why we overspend--and what to do about it
BC Business
The Exception Is the Rule: Underestimating and Overspending on Exceptional Expenses
Abigail B. Sussman, Adam L. Alter
Jan 9New Year's resolution: Don't sweat the sweat
Waterbury Republican American
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 7Don't sweat the sweat
The Bulletin
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 6Do heavier waiters affect how much we order?
Medical News Today
Plate Size and Color Suggestibility: The Delboeuf Illusion’s Bias on Serving and Eating Behavior
Koert Van Ittersum, Brian Wansink
Jan 6I went on vacation alone. Why do people think that means I'm disturbed?
Vox
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Jan 5Make New Year's Resolutions That Actually Stick
TIME Moneyland
The Progress Bias in Goal Pursuit: When One Step Forward Seems Larger than One Step Back
Margaret C. Campbell, Caleb Warren
Jan 5Some Consumers Use 'Servant' Brands to Gain Sense of Power
Newswise
Do Materialists Prefer the “Brand-as-Servant”? The Interactive Effect of Anthropomorphized Brand Roles and Materialism on Consumer Responses
Hyeongmin Christian Kim , Thomas Kramer
Jan 5The Science Behind Keeping Your New Year's Resolutions
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
The Progress Bias in Goal Pursuit: When One Step Forward Seems Larger than One Step Back
Margaret C. Campbell, Caleb Warren
Jan 5The Science Behind Keeping Your New Year's Resolutions
Credit.com News
The Progress Bias in Goal Pursuit: When One Step Forward Seems Larger than One Step Back
Margaret C. Campbell, Caleb Warren
Jan 5Don't sweat the sweat
The Ledger (Lakeland, FL)
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Jan 2New Year Resolutions Come With A Forget-Me-Not Tag
Apex Beats
Plate Size and Color Suggestibility: The Delboeuf Illusion’s Bias on Serving and Eating Behavior
Koert Van Ittersum, Brian Wansink
Jan 1Influence of Self-Image on How We Attain Goals
Psych Central
Pursuing Attainment versus Maintenance Goals: The Interplay of Self-Construal and Goal Type on Consumer Motivation
Haiyang Yang, Antonios Stamatogiannakis, Amitava Chattopadhyay
Jan 1Influence of Self-Image on How We Attain Goals
Psych Central
Pursuing Attainment versus Maintenance Goals: The Interplay of Self-Construal and Goal Type on Consumer Motivation
Haiyang Yang, Antonios Stamatogiannakis, Amitava Chattopadhyay
Dec 315 Hacks For Making Your New Year's Resolutions Stick
The Huffington Post
Plate Size and Color Suggestibility: The Delboeuf Illusion’s Bias on Serving and Eating Behavior
Koert Van Ittersum, Brian Wansink
Dec 29'Star Wars' movie success driven by nostalgia, social science explains link
International Business Times Australia
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Dec 28New Year's resolution: Don't sweat the sweat
The Charlotte Observer
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Dec 28How Fitness Trackers Might Make Us Hate Fitness
Refinery29
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Dec 27Shaffer: New Year's resolution - Don't sweat the sweat
The News & Observer
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Dec 27Secret sauce of Star Wars lies deep in your brain
The Hindu
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Dec 24How self-image affects the ways consumers interact with products and services
Science Blog
Pursuing Attainment versus Maintenance Goals: The Interplay of Self-Construal and Goal Type on Consumer Motivation
Haiyang Yang, Antonios Stamatogiannakis, Amitava Chattopadhyay
Dec 24Fitness trackers mostly just remind you that working out is not that fun
SBS Australia
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Dec 23Expert Reveals Three Simple Tricks for Picking the Best Presents
Daily Mail
Overindividuation in Gift Giving: Shopping for Multiple Recipients Leads Givers to Choose Unique but Less Preferred Gifts
Mary Steffel, Robyn A. LeBoeuf
Dec 23Do tracking gadgets turn fun into work?
Futurity.org
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Dec 23What Drives The Holiday Spirit? A Christmas Investigation
Boise State Public Radio
Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Dec 23Guest Blog: Millennials Do Nostalgia Their Way
Broadcasting & Cable
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Dec 23What Drives The Holiday Spirit? A Christmas Investigation
89.3 WFPL Louisville Public Radio
Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Dec 22Cyber Santa? Tips for choosing the best PC gift
Gainesville Times - Northern VA News
Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Dec 22How self-image affects the ways consumers interact with products and services
The Hub at Johns Hopkins
Pursuing Attainment versus Maintenance Goals: The Interplay of Self-Construal and Goal Type on Consumer Motivation
Haiyang Yang, Antonios Stamatogiannakis, Amitava Chattopadhyay
Dec 22We must do more than #PrayForParis
The Depaulia
The Nature of Slacktivism: How the Social Observability of an Initial Act of Token Support Affects Subsequent Prosocial Action
Kirk Kristofferson, Katherine White, John Peloza
Dec 22What Drives The Holiday Spirit? A Christmas Investigation
KRCU
Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Dec 22Why counting your steps could make you unhappier
MedicalXpress.com
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Dec 21Better gift giving -- with Science
Palatinate (Durham University UK)
Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Dec 21Why Counting Your Steps Could Make You Unhappier
Duke Today
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Dec 197 Things You Need To Stop Doing To Be More Productive, Backed By Science
The New York Observer
“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Dec 18How to Win a Best Picture Oscar
Inverse
Popular Appeal versus Expert Judgments of Motion Pictures
Morris B. Holbrook
Dec 18The 5 Secrets To Buying The Perfect Christmas Gift
Elle UK
The Presenter's Paradox
Kimberlee Weaver, Stephen M. Garcia, Norbert Schwartz
Dec 153 Ways to Make Your Gifts Extra Meaningful Based on Scientific Claims
Food World News
Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Dec 15It's Not the Holidays That Make Kids Materialistic
The Huffington Post
Material Parenting: How the Use of Goods in Parenting Fosters Materialism in the Next Generation
Marsha L. Richins, Lan Nguyen Chaplin
Dec 145 Scientifically Proven Ways To Make Your Gifts Meaningful
The Huffington Post
Intergenerationally Gifted Asset Dispositions
Tonya Williams Bradford
Dec 1125 Ways to Save Hundreds on Your Holiday Shopping
TIME Moneyland
Behavioral Consistency and Inconsistency in the Resolution of Goal Conflict
Juliano Laran, Chris Janiszewski
Dec 109 Things You Can Do Today That Will To Save You Money
Bustle
Money Isn’t Everything, but It Helps If It Doesn’t Look Used: How the Physical Appearance of Money Influences Spending
Fabrizio Di Muro, Theodore J. Noseworthy
Dec 10We must do more than #PrayForParis
The Depaulia
The Nature of Slacktivism: How the Social Observability of an Initial Act of Token Support Affects Subsequent Prosocial Action
Kirk Kristofferson, Katherine White, John Peloza
Dec 5The good in bad presents
NEWS.com.au
Why Feasibility Matters More to Gift Receivers than to Givers: A Construal-Level Approach to Gift Giving
Ernest Baskin, Cheryl J. Wakslak, Yaacov Trope, Nathan Novemsky
Dec 3Your Self-Image May Influence How You Set Goals
Newswise
Pursuing Attainment versus Maintenance Goals: The Interplay of Self-Construal and Goal Type on Consumer Motivation
Haiyang Yang, Antonios Stamatogiannakis, Amitava Chattopadhyay
Dec 3Your self-image may influence how you set goals, research shows
Science Daily
Pursuing Attainment versus Maintenance Goals: The Interplay of Self-Construal and Goal Type on Consumer Motivation
Haiyang Yang, Antonios Stamatogiannakis, Amitava Chattopadhyay
Dec 1How To Break Your Netflix Binge-Watching Habit
Lifehacker Australia
Slow Down! Insensitivity to Rate of Consumption Leads to Avoidable Satiation
Jeff Galak, Justin Kruger, George Loewenstein
Nov 30Inside Your Health: Addressing Compulsive Shopping
KSTP ABC-5 Minneapolis
An Expanded Conceptualization and a New Measure of Compulsive Buying
Ridgway, Kukar‐Kinney, and Monroe
Nov 30The history of Black Friday more colorful than you think
Las Cruces Bulletin
The Many Shades of Rose-Colored Glasses: An Evolutionary Approach to the Influence of Different Positive Emotions
Griskevicius, Shiota, Nowlis
Nov 28Beware of these 3 retail schemes used to target holiday shoppers
Minneapolis Star Tribune
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Nov 27Ten tricks from retailers that make you spend more
Business Spectator (Australia)
Price Endings, Left-Digit Effects, and Choice
Kenneth C. Manning, David E. Sprott
Nov 265 'Negative' Things Your Brain Is Thankful For
Braindecoder
Attaining Satisfaction
Cecile K. Cho, Gita Venkataramani Johar
Nov 26How To Survive (And Maybe Even Enjoy) Thanksgiving Dinner
Jefferson Public Radio (Southern Oregon)
“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Nov 24How To Survive (And Maybe Even Enjoy) Thanksgiving Dinner
WBEZ
“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Nov 23Why wanting expensive things makes us so much happier than buying them
Ceylon Daily News
When Wanting Is Better than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process
Marsha L. Richins
Nov 23We must do more than #PrayForParis
The Depaulia
The Nature of Slacktivism: How the Social Observability of an Initial Act of Token Support Affects Subsequent Prosocial Action
Kirk Kristofferson, Katherine White, John Peloza
Nov 20Know these 10 'tricks' retailers use to make you spend more money
Las Vegas Review-Journal
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Nov 193 Ways Guilt Can Motivate You
ABC-23 Bakersfield
Cross-Domain Effects of Guilt on Desire for Self-Improvement Products
Thomas Allard , Katherine White
Nov 18Avoid These 10 Retail Scams That Target Holiday Shoppers
The Huffington Post
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Nov 18Avoid These 10 Retail Scams That Target Holiday Shoppers
Go Banking Rates
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Nov 18WhatsApp Hoaxes That Arose From The Paris Attacks, & Why We Share When We're Afraid
Vulcan Post
The Impact of Fear on Emotional Brand Attachment
Lea Dunn, JoAndrea Hoegg
Nov 17Everything You Think You Know About Happiness Is Wrong
malaysiandigest.com
How Happiness Affects Choice
Cassie Mogilner, Jennifer Aaker, Sepandar D. Kamvar
Nov 17Scarcity, not abundance, enhances consumer creativity, study says
Science Daily
Creating When You Have Less: The Impact of Resource Scarcity on Product Use Creativity
Ravi Mehta, Meng Zhu
Nov 17Everything You Think You Know About Happiness Is Wrong
How Happiness Affects Choice
Cassie Mogilner, Jennifer Aaker, Sepandar D. Kamvar
Nov 17How to Organize Your Kitchen for Weight Loss
Shape Magazine
"So Cute I Could Eat It Up": Priming Effects of Cute Products on Indulgent Consumption
Gergana Y. Nenkov, Maura L. Scott
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