JCR Authors in the News (Last 30 Days)

Browse and Search the Publicity Archive »
Press Releases »
Story ImageNew York Times
Affixing More Value to the Ordinary Experiences of Life
August 29, 2014

Recent research from the Journal of Consumer Research could help many Americans find peace of mind as they contemplate their retirement savings. If you can cover basic expenses, pursuing inexpensive, everyday things that bring comfort and satisfaction can lead to happiness equal to jetting about on international trips in your 70s and 80s.

Happiness from Ordinary and Extraordinary Experiences
by Amit Bhattacharjee, Cassie Mogilner
Story ImageTIME
The Spending Mistake Millennials Are Making
August 27, 2014

A study from The Journal of Consumer Research found that shoppers who pay with plastic focus more on the benefits of the purchase than the price, while those who pay with cash focus on price first. In other words, we’re more likely to make the decision to purchase an item when we know we’ll be charging it.

Do Payment Mechanisms Change the Way Consumers Perceive Products?
by Promothesh Chatterjee, Randall L. Rose
Story ImageYahoo! Finance
The Procrastination Doom Loop—and How to Break It
August 26, 2014

A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research points out that people have a habit of managing goals and tasks in specific time categories —- we plan activities by the day, expenses by the month, and resolutions by the year. This way of thinking can separate us from future selves.

The Categorization of Time and Its Impact on Task Initiation
by Yanping Tu, Dilip Soman
Story ImageTIME
The 10 Most Unexpected Ways to Be Happy, Backed By Science
August 26, 2014

Overworked and overburdened is a recipe for unhappiness. So if you want to be happy, learn how to say no. So then, how should you say it? Say I don’t. Believe it or not, the phrase “I don’t” is up eight times more likely to work than saying “I can’t.” It’s more than doubly effective versus the simple “no.”

“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
by Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Story ImageThe Atlantic
The Procrastination Doom Loop—and How to Break It
August 26, 2014

A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research points out that people have a habit of managing goals and tasks in specific time categories —- we plan activities by the day, expenses by the month, and resolutions by the year. This way of thinking can separate us from future selves.

The Categorization of Time and Its Impact on Task Initiation
by Yanping Tu, Dilip Soman
Story ImageFox News
Will ice bucket challenge have lasting value?
August 25, 2014

If a fundraising campaign has a high percentage of people who voice their support without actually donating that could raise the problem of "slacktivism," which is the practice of engaging in virtual support such as "liking" a charity's page on Facebook, without having any real-world effect.

The Nature of Slacktivism: How the Social Observability of an Initial Act of Token Support Affects Subsequent Prosocial Action
by Kirk Kristofferson, Katherine White, John Peloza
Story ImageYahoo! News
Will Ice Bucket Challenge Have Lasting Value?
August 25, 2014

If a fundraising campaign has a high percentage of people who voice their support without actually donating that could raise the problem of "slacktivism," which is the practice of engaging in virtual support such as "liking" a charity's page on Facebook, without having any real-world effect.

The Nature of Slacktivism: How the Social Observability of an Initial Act of Token Support Affects Subsequent Prosocial Action
by Kirk Kristofferson, Katherine White, John Peloza
Story ImageThe Week
The Not-So-Secret Secrets to Banishing Bad Money Habits
August 25, 2014

In a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, researchers found that people are less likely to spend money when using a larger denomination, like a $20 bill, than if they had 20 $1 bills. Why? To participants, it seemed like larger bills would be harder to replace than smaller ones.

The Denomination Effect
by Priya Raghubir and Joydeep Srivastava
Story ImageSalon
Low-calorie Menus Are Actually Making You Fatter
August 17, 2014

Those “Low-Calorie” sections that are increasingly popping up in restaurant menus, according to a new study appear to have a backfire effect. In a recent study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, placing low-calorie dishes into their own low-calorie category can cause consumers to instead choose higher calorie meals that could be making them fatter.

How and When Grouping Low-Calorie Options Reduces the Benefits of Providing Dish-Specific Calorie Information
by Jeffrey R. Parker, Donald R. Lehmann
Story ImageTODAY
'Like Losing a Friend': Some TV Fans Mourn Loss of Their Favorite Characters
August 14, 2014

Uber fans get so close to the characters on their favorite shows that they can actually go into a period of mourning when the series or any of its main characters get the ax. In fact, the grief can be so intense that it can feel like the aftermath of a real-life divorce or a death in the family, according to a study in the Journal of Consumer Research.

When Narrative Brands End: The Impact of Narrative Closure and Consumption Sociality on Loss Accommodation
by Cristel Antonia Russell, Hope Jensen Schau
Story ImageSydney Morning Herald
What Is the Appeal of Extreme Exercise?
August 14, 2014

As well as a sense of liberation, extreme exercise can bring a greater sense of control. When people are feeling a loss of control, they're particularly likely to go for high-effort things like very intense workouts because it makes them feel empowered.

Doing It the Hard Way: How Low Control Drives Preferences for High-Effort Products and Services
by Keisha M. Cutright, Adriana Samper
Story ImageKnowledge@Wharton
Shhh! Marketing Embarrassing Products in the Age of Social Media
August 12, 2014

If the typical purchaser of embarrassing products believes he or she can mitigate embarrassment by filling out the shopping cart with cough drops, tissues or other distraction items, some research suggests the coping mechanism can backfire. The type of products that get put in the shopping basket alongside embarrassing items matters more than the number of “distractions.”

Balancing the Basket: The Role of Shopping Basket Composition in Embarrassment
by Sean Blair, Neal J. Roese
Story ImageFast Company
5 Things You're Doing That Seem Productive, But Aren't
August 11, 2014

At some point, most of us will find shortcuts to maximize our efficiency to get ahead. After all, if we all need to get to the same destination, you don’t want to be the one taking the long road. Unfortunately, sometimes we’ll adopt systems and strategies that don’t actually propel us forward the way we think they do.

“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
by Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Story ImageThe Guardian
If It's Good for You, It Can't Be Nice
August 8, 2014

Parents of three-year-olds won't be hugely surprised by new research describing what happens when you give them carrots, or other unexciting foods, then tell them they should eat what's on the plate because it's good for them: they don't. The study suggests that three- to five-year-olds apply a simple rule: if a food is good for one goal (such as long-term health), it must be less good for another goal (a delicious taste experience).

If It's Useful and You Know It, Do You Eat? Preschoolers Refrain from Instrumental Food
by Michal Maimaran, Ayelet Fishbach
Story ImageTODAY
Consumers Want 'Accidentally' Green Household Products: Study
August 8, 2014

A forthcoming paper in the Journal of Consumer Research finds that if people think a company went out of its way to develop an environmentally conscious household product, they won’t buy it. Customers are only attracted to a product’s green bona fides if they believe its eco-friendly attributes came about as a by-product of some other goal.

When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
by George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Story ImageThe Telegraph
The Triathlon Generation: Why Are We So Obsessed with Extreme Exercise?
August 8, 2014

New research suggests that people feeling a loss of control seek out products that require hard work, such as new sports equipment. The more overwhelmed you feel, the harder you want to push yourself to take control of an aspect of your life, such as exercise.

Doing It the Hard Way: How Low Control Drives Preferences for High-Effort Products and Services
by Keisha M. Cutright, Adriana Samper
Story ImageTIME
Why Are People Addicted to CrossFit and Other Brutal Workouts?
August 6, 2014

A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research concludes that feeling as though parts of your life have slipped out of your control spurs a craving for effortful activity. When people are feeling a loss of control, they’re particularly likely to go for these high-effort things like very intense workouts because it makes them feel empowered.

Doing It the Hard Way: How Low Control Drives Preferences for High-Effort Products and Services
by Keisha M. Cutright, Adriana Samper
Story ImageThe Globe and Mail
The Benefit of Beauty Has Its Limits
August 5, 2014

A recent study asking participants to visit a fictional website either to help a disaster-relief agency select a poster child for its campaign or to select a child to sponsor found that images of attractive children tended to evoke less empathy in participants, in part because attractive children were assumed to have superior social skills and abilities and require less adult protection.

The Price of Being Beautiful: Negative Effects of Attractiveness on Empathy for Children in Need
by Robert J. Fisher, Yu Ma
Story ImagePacific Standard
'Relatable' Indeed: Fictional Stories Are More Moving Than We Predict
August 5, 2014

Based on the inaccurate belief that they will have a stronger emotional reaction to stories that are based on fact, or ones that are set in the recent rather than the distant past, people may miss out on seeing a more enjoyable play about a distant city, watching a more exciting game recorded earlier, or reading a more entertaining fictional novel.

Reading Fictional Stories and Winning Delayed Prizes: The Surprising Emotional Impact of Distant Events
by Jane E. J. Ebert, Tom Meyvis
Story ImageThe Economist
Suitable Disruption
August 4, 2014

People who have the confidence to dress informally and to disrupt traditional business codes are perceived as more independent, innovative, and competent. Researchers at Harvard Business School call this the “red sneakers effect." In a study published by The Journal of Consumer Research, they note that professors dressed less formally at academic events as they gained higher status.

The Red Sneakers Effect: Inferring Status and Competence from Signals of Nonconformity
by Silvia Bellezza, Francesca Gino, Anat Keinan
Story ImageToronto Star
Avoiding the Fear Factor in Financial Decisions
July 31, 2014

Fear is a powerful motivator for consumers, and it underlies more of our spending decisions than we’d care to admit. One recent academic study even found that when consumers are fearful and alone, they might turn to brands for comfort, much as they would toward a human being.

The Impact of Fear on Emotional Brand Attachment
by Lea Dunn, JoAndrea Hoegg
Story ImageForbes
3 Behavior Change Experts Debate: What Does It Take To Kick Bad Money Habits?
July 31, 2014

In a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, researchers found that people are less likely to spend money when using a larger denomination, like a $20 bill, than if they had 20 $1 bills. Why? To participants, it seemed like larger bills would be harder to replace than smaller ones.

The Denomination Effect
by Priya Raghubir and Joydeep Srivastava
Story ImageYahoo! News
How Menus Trick You into Spending More
July 31, 2014

By calorie-organizing a menu, restaurants make it easier for people to use the general low-calorie label to dismiss all low-calorie options early in the decision process, according to a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research.

How and When Grouping Low-Calorie Options Reduces the Benefits of Providing Dish-Specific Calorie Information
by Jeffrey R. Parker, Donald R. Lehmann
Story ImageThe Atlantic
People Are Drawn to Hard Work When Life Gets Overwhelming
July 31, 2014

A recent study published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that people prefer products that require them to work hard when they feel low in control. In the study, feeling out of control with respect to their health especially drew people to exercise but feeling generally out of control could still make intense workouts seem appealing.

Doing It the Hard Way: How Low Control Drives Preferences for High-Effort Products and Services
by Keisha M. Cutright, Adriana Samper
Story ImageMarketWatch
How Menus Trick You into Spending More
July 31, 2014

Surprisingly, restaurants provide low calorie labels on their menus that can actually cause people to actually choose higher calorie (and also more expensive) options, according to a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research. Most menus are complex, offering numerous dishes with lots of ingredients, so diners have come to expect low-calorie food to either taste bad or not fill them up.

How and When Grouping Low-Calorie Options Reduces the Benefits of Providing Dish-Specific Calorie Information
by Jeffrey R. Parker, Donald R. Lehmann
Story ImageArs Technica
When Having a Hard Day, People Think Drugs Wear Off Faster
July 30, 2014

Researchers have now shown that we think drugs will wear off faster when we're working harder. And, given the chance to self-medicate, we'll keep popping pills as long as things are stressful or difficult.

The Status Costs of Subordinate Cultural Capital: At-Home Fathers’ Collective Pursuit of Cultural Legitimacy Through Capitalizing Consumption Practices
by Gokcen Coskuner-Balli, Craig J. Thompson
Browse and Search the Publicity Archive »
Press Releases »
DateNews ItemArticle Mentioned
Aug 28Should Nonfiction Writers Look to Novels to Make Their Work More Emotional?
Bustle
Reading Fictional Stories and Winning Delayed Prizes: The Surprising Emotional Impact of Distant Events
Jane E. J. Ebert, Tom Meyvis
Aug 28Heart trumps brain when it comes to movies and books
Metro New York
Reading Fictional Stories and Winning Delayed Prizes: The Surprising Emotional Impact of Distant Events
Jane E. J. Ebert, Tom Meyvis
Aug 28Study: Moviegoers Cannot Tell Fact From Fiction
Jewish Business News
Reading Fictional Stories and Winning Delayed Prizes: The Surprising Emotional Impact of Distant Events
Jane E. J. Ebert, Tom Meyvis
Aug 27Tragic fiction may leave you emotionally upset: study
Business Standard
Reading Fictional Stories and Winning Delayed Prizes: The Surprising Emotional Impact of Distant Events
Jane E. J. Ebert, Tom Meyvis
Aug 27Customers Are More Likely To Purchase 'Greener' Products, Study Finds
Headlines & Global News
When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Aug 27Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products?
ECNmag.com
When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Aug 27The Procrastination Doom Loop—and How to Break It
GovExec.com
The Categorization of Time and Its Impact on Task Initiation
Yanping Tu, Dilip Soman
Aug 27Tragic fiction may leave you emotionally upset
India.com
Reading Fictional Stories and Winning Delayed Prizes: The Surprising Emotional Impact of Distant Events
Jane E. J. Ebert, Tom Meyvis
Aug 27Getting People To Get Things Done – A New Psychological Trick
Practical Ethics
The Categorization of Time and Its Impact on Task Initiation
Yanping Tu, Dilip Soman
Aug 27Avoid fear factor in financial decisions
Tasmania Mercury
The Impact of Fear on Emotional Brand Attachment
Lea Dunn, JoAndrea Hoegg
Aug 26Do Moviegoers Prefer Fact Or Fiction? The Surprising Answer
Science 2.0
Reading Fictional Stories and Winning Delayed Prizes: The Surprising Emotional Impact of Distant Events
Jane E. J. Ebert, Tom Meyvis
Aug 26Consumers Associate Green Products With Lower Quality
University Herald
When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Aug 26Outsourcing parenthood? It takes a village AND the marketplace to raise a child
Science Daily
Outsourcing Parenthood? How Families Manage Care Assemblages Using Paid Commercial Services
Amber M. Epp, Sunaina R. Velagaleti
Aug 26Getting things done: How does changing the way you think about deadlines help you reach your goals?
Science Daily
The Categorization of Time and Its Impact on Task Initiation
Yanping Tu, Dilip Soman
Aug 26An inconvenient truth: Does responsible consumption benefit corporations more than society?
Science Daily
Creating the Responsible Consumer: Moralistic Governance Regimes and Consumer Subjectivity
Markus Giesler, Ela Veresiu
Aug 26Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products?
Science Daily
When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Aug 26No purchase required to win? Devoted customers not so sure
Phys.Org
Lucky Loyalty: The Effect of Consumer Effort on Predictions of Randomly Determined Marketing Outcomes
Rebecca Walker Reczek, Kelly L. Haws, Christopher A. Summers
Aug 26Getting things done: How does changing the way you think about deadlines help you reach your goals?
Phys.Org
The Categorization of Time and Its Impact on Task Initiation
Yanping Tu, Dilip Soman
Aug 26Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products?
Phys.Org
When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Aug 26Outsourcing parenthood? It takes a village AND the marketplace to raise a child
EurekAlert!
Outsourcing Parenthood? How Families Manage Care Assemblages Using Paid Commercial Services
Amber M. Epp, Sunaina R. Velagaleti
Aug 26An inconvenient truth: Does responsible consumption benefit corporations more than society?
EurekAlert!
Creating the Responsible Consumer: Moralistic Governance Regimes and Consumer Subjectivity
Markus Giesler, Ela Veresiu
Aug 26No purchase required to win? Devoted customers not so sure
Science Daily
Lucky Loyalty: The Effect of Consumer Effort on Predictions of Randomly Determined Marketing Outcomes
Rebecca Walker Reczek, Kelly L. Haws, Christopher A. Summers
Aug 26Getting things done: How does changing the way you think about deadlines help you reach your goals?
PsyPost
The Categorization of Time and Its Impact on Task Initiation
Yanping Tu, Dilip Soman
Aug 26How do former churchgoers build a new moral identity?
PsyPost
The Marketization of Religion: Field, Capital, and Consumer Identity
James H. McAlexander, Beth Leavenworth DuFault, Diane M. Martin, John W. Schouten
Aug 26Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products?
PsyPost
When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Aug 26An Inconvenient Truth: Green Behavior Benefits Corporations More Than Society
Science 2.0
When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Aug 26No purchase required to win? Devoted customers not so sure
e! Science News
Lucky Loyalty: The Effect of Consumer Effort on Predictions of Randomly Determined Marketing Outcomes
Rebecca Walker Reczek, Kelly L. Haws, Christopher A. Summers
Aug 26Disillusioned Churchgoers Undergo A Moral Identity Crisis
Science 2.0
The Marketization of Religion: Field, Capital, and Consumer Identity
James H. McAlexander, Beth Leavenworth DuFault, Diane M. Martin, John W. Schouten
Aug 26Outsourcing parenthood? It takes a village AND the marketplace to raise a child
Phys.Org
Outsourcing Parenthood? How Families Manage Care Assemblages Using Paid Commercial Services
Amber M. Epp, Sunaina R. Velagaleti
Aug 26How do former churchgoers build a new moral identity?
Phys.Org
The Marketization of Religion: Field, Capital, and Consumer Identity
James H. McAlexander, Beth Leavenworth DuFault, Diane M. Martin, John W. Schouten
Aug 26Fact or fiction: Which do moviegoers prefer?
Phys.Org
Reading Fictional Stories and Winning Delayed Prizes: The Surprising Emotional Impact of Distant Events
Jane E. J. Ebert, Tom Meyvis
Aug 26Outsourcing Parenthood: It Takes The Marketplace To Raise A Child
Science 2.0
Outsourcing Parenthood? How Families Manage Care Assemblages Using Paid Commercial Services
Amber M. Epp, Sunaina R. Velagaleti
Aug 26Study: More Parents Comfortable Outsourcing Parenthood
Chinatopix
Outsourcing Parenthood? How Families Manage Care Assemblages Using Paid Commercial Services
Amber M. Epp, Sunaina R. Velagaleti
Aug 26Consumers wary of changes that make products greener
ConsumerAffairs.com
When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Aug 26Outsourcing parenthood? It takes a village AND the marketplace to raise a child
Science Codex
Outsourcing Parenthood? How Families Manage Care Assemblages Using Paid Commercial Services
Amber M. Epp, Sunaina R. Velagaleti
Aug 26No purchase required to win? Devoted customers not so sure
Science Codex
Lucky Loyalty: The Effect of Consumer Effort on Predictions of Randomly Determined Marketing Outcomes
Rebecca Walker Reczek, Kelly L. Haws, Christopher A. Summers
Aug 26Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products?
EurekAlert!
When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Aug 26An inconvenient truth: Does responsible consumption benefit corporations more than society?
Science Codex
Creating the Responsible Consumer: Moralistic Governance Regimes and Consumer Subjectivity
Markus Giesler, Ela Veresiu
Aug 26How do former churchgoers build a new moral identity?
EurekAlert!
The Marketization of Religion: Field, Capital, and Consumer Identity
James H. McAlexander, Beth Leavenworth DuFault, Diane M. Martin, John W. Schouten
Aug 26Fact or fiction: Which do moviegoers prefer?
EurekAlert!
Reading Fictional Stories and Winning Delayed Prizes: The Surprising Emotional Impact of Distant Events
Jane E. J. Ebert, Tom Meyvis
Aug 26Getting things done: How does changing the way you think about deadlines help you reach your goals?
EurekAlert!
The Categorization of Time and Its Impact on Task Initiation
Yanping Tu, Dilip Soman
Aug 24Will Ice Bucket Challenge Have Lasting Value?
Yahoo! News UK
The Nature of Slacktivism: How the Social Observability of an Initial Act of Token Support Affects Subsequent Prosocial Action
Kirk Kristofferson, Katherine White, John Peloza
Aug 22Will Ice Bucket Challenge Have Lasting Value?
Live Science
The Nature of Slacktivism: How the Social Observability of an Initial Act of Token Support Affects Subsequent Prosocial Action
Kirk Kristofferson, Katherine White, John Peloza
Aug 22How menus trick you into spending more
MSN Money
How and When Grouping Low-Calorie Options Reduces the Benefits of Providing Dish-Specific Calorie Information
Jeffrey R. Parker, Donald R. Lehmann
Aug 20Socially connected people more likely to show bias in their giving
UK Fundraising
Prosocial Behavior in Intergroup Relations: How Donor Self-Construal and Recipient Group-Membership Shape Generosity
Rod Duclos, Alixandra Barasch
Aug 20Does the Ice Bucket Challenge help battle ALS?
Lafayette Journal and Courier
The Nature of Slacktivism: How the Social Observability of an Initial Act of Token Support Affects Subsequent Prosocial Action
Kirk Kristofferson, Katherine White, John Peloza
Aug 18They Love the '90s: Using Nostalgia to Woo Millennials
American Express OPEN Forum
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Aug 18Is the Ice Bucket Challenge 'slacktivism?'
9NEWS.com
The Nature of Slacktivism: How the Social Observability of an Initial Act of Token Support Affects Subsequent Prosocial Action
Kirk Kristofferson, Katherine White, John Peloza
Aug 17Consumers Want “Accidentally Green” Products
Good Housekeeping
When Going Green Backfires: How Firm Intentions Shape the Evaluation of Socially Beneficial Product Enhancements
George E. Newman, Margarita Gorlin, Ravi Dhar
Aug 14What is the appeal of 'extreme exercise'?
Illawarra Mercury
Doing It the Hard Way: How Low Control Drives Preferences for High-Effort Products and Services
Keisha M. Cutright, Adriana Samper
Aug 13How Low-Calorie Menus Backfire and Potentially Help Us Gain Weight
AlterNet
How and When Grouping Low-Calorie Options Reduces the Benefits of Providing Dish-Specific Calorie Information
Jeffrey R. Parker, Donald R. Lehmann
Aug 13What is the appeal of 'extreme exercise'?
Stuff.co.nz
Doing It the Hard Way: How Low Control Drives Preferences for High-Effort Products and Services
Keisha M. Cutright, Adriana Samper
Aug 13What is the appeal of 'extreme exercise'?
Brisbane Times
Doing It the Hard Way: How Low Control Drives Preferences for High-Effort Products and Services
Keisha M. Cutright, Adriana Samper
Aug 12Tel Aviv U. Researcher: Shifting Ad Images Create Negative Feelings About Product
Jewish Business News
Imagining Yourself in the Scene: The Interactive Effects of Goal-Driven Self-Imagery and Visual Perspectives on Consumer Behavior
Yuwei Jiang, Rashmi Adaval, Yael Steinhart, Robert S. Wyer, Jr.
Aug 11Do you crave for temporarily unavailable goods?
ANINEWS India
How Non-Consumption Shapes Desire
Xianchi Dai, Ayelet Fishbach
Aug 11Do you crave for temporarily unavailable goods?
Business Standard
How Non-Consumption Shapes Desire
Xianchi Dai, Ayelet Fishbach
Aug 10Why end of favorite TV serials are akin to death o loved ones for fans
Business Standard
When Narrative Brands End: The Impact of Narrative Closure and Consumption Sociality on Loss Accommodation
Cristel Antonia Russell, Hope Jensen Schau
Aug 10Why end of favorite TV serials are akin to death of loved ones for fans
ANINEWS India
When Narrative Brands End: The Impact of Narrative Closure and Consumption Sociality on Loss Accommodation
Cristel Antonia Russell, Hope Jensen Schau
Aug 9I don't want the guy behind the counter to be my friend -- I just want him to sell me some cheese
National Post
Should the Devil Sell Prada? Retail Rejection Increases Aspiring Consumers' Desire for the Brand
Morgan K. Ward, Darren W. Dahl
Aug 7How fans mourn the death of popular TV series
Science Daily
When Narrative Brands End: The Impact of Narrative Closure and Consumption Sociality on Loss Accommodation
Cristel Antonia Russell, Hope Jensen Schau
Aug 7Hey you: Stop being so rude! It's costing us both money
Bob Sullivan.net
We’ll Be Honest, This Won’t Be the Best Article You’ll Ever Read: The Use of Dispreferred Markers in Word-of-Mouth Communication
Ryan Hamilton, Kathleen D. Vohs, Ann L. McGill
Aug 7How Fans Mourn the Death of Popular TV Series
Newswise
When Narrative Brands End: The Impact of Narrative Closure and Consumption Sociality on Loss Accommodation
Cristel Antonia Russell, Hope Jensen Schau
Aug 6Are You a Cultish Devotee to Your Exercise Regimen?
Jezebel
Doing It the Hard Way: How Low Control Drives Preferences for High-Effort Products and Services
Keisha M. Cutright, Adriana Samper
Aug 6American University Researcher Reveals the Profound Impact Cancelled TV Series Have on Consumer Behavior
When Narrative Brands End: The Impact of Narrative Closure and Consumption Sociality on Loss Accommodation
Cristel Antonia Russell, Hope Jensen Schau
Aug 5Out of Sight Out of Mind? Study Shows How Non-Consumption Shapes Desire
Science Daily
How Non-Consumption Shapes Desire
Xianchi Dai, Ayelet Fishbach
Aug 5Out of Sight Out of Mind? Study Shows How Non-Consumption Shapes Desire
Newswise
How Non-Consumption Shapes Desire
Xianchi Dai, Ayelet Fishbach
Aug 5Have We Reached Peak PBR?
Outside Magazine
What Makes Things Cool? How Autonomy Influences Perceived Coolness
Caleb Warren, Margaret C. Campbell
Aug 5Here's How To Get Your Kids To Eat Healthy
Wall St. Cheat Sheet
If It's Useful and You Know It, Do You Eat? Preschoolers Refrain from Instrumental Food
Michal Maimaran, Ayelet Fishbach
Aug 5Researchers Probe the Use of Fear in Marketing
ABC (Australia)
The Impact of Fear on Emotional Brand Attachment
Lea Dunn, JoAndrea Hoegg
Aug 4Retail Pricing Strategies: Do Shoppers Prefer Deep Discounts or Everyday Low Prices?
NYU Experience Stern Faculty & Research
Retailer Pricing Strategy and Consumer Choice under Price Uncertainty
Shai Danziger, Liat Hadar, Vicki G. Morwitz
Aug 4Want your kids to eat healthily? Don't tell them what they're eating it good for them
Diabetes Health
If It's Useful and You Know It, Do You Eat? Preschoolers Refrain from Instrumental Food
Michal Maimaran, Ayelet Fishbach
Aug 3Experiments With Humans Can Save Wildlife
Live Science
A Room with a Viewpoint: Using Social Norms to Motivate Environmental Conservation in Hotels
Noah J. Goldstein, Robert B. Cialdini, Vladas Griskevicius
Aug 3Want Kids to Eat Their Vegetables? Don't Tell Them About the Health Benefits
Care2.com
If It's Useful and You Know It, Do You Eat? Preschoolers Refrain from Instrumental Food
Michal Maimaran, Ayelet Fishbach
Aug 2Empathy or justice: What makes consumers donate more to charity?
Brain Mysteries
I’m Moral, but I Won’t Help You: The Distinct Roles of Empathy and Justice in Donations
Saerom Lee, Karen Page Winterich, William T. Ross Jr.
Aug 1Avoiding buyer's remorse: Is product satisfaction higher when consumers are flush?
Brain Mysteries
The Bottom Dollar Effect: The Influence of Spending to Zero on Pain of Payment and Satisfaction
Robin L. Soster, Andrew D. Gershoff, William O. Bearden
Aug 1Distorted memory can trick you into overspending
CreditCards.com
Licensing Indulgence in the Present by Distorting Memories of Past Behavior
Frank May, Caglar Irmak
Aug 1Kids and healthy eating habits
The British Psychological Society
If It's Useful and You Know It, Do You Eat? Preschoolers Refrain from Instrumental Food
Michal Maimaran, Ayelet Fishbach
Jul 31How menus trick you into spending more
New York Post
How and When Grouping Low-Calorie Options Reduces the Benefits of Providing Dish-Specific Calorie Information
Jeffrey R. Parker, Donald R. Lehmann
Jul 30The Easy Way to Get Kids to Eat Healthy Food
Health Magazine
If It's Useful and You Know It, Do You Eat? Preschoolers Refrain from Instrumental Food
Michal Maimaran, Ayelet Fishbach
Browse and Search the Publicity Archive »
Press Releases »