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Story ImageNBC News
Parents Spend More on Girls Than on Boys in a Recession
May 19, 2015

New research finds that parents are more likely to spend money on girls than boys when the economy is shaky. The study, forthcoming in the Journal of Consumer Research, found that evolutionary biology kicks in when times are tight and parents have limited resources to allocate to their kids.

Spending on Daughters versus Sons in Economic Recessions
by Kristina M. Durante, Vladas Griskevicius, Joseph P. Redden, Andrew Edward White
Story ImagePsychology Today
The Critical Difference between Explanations and Excuses
May 14, 2015

Claiming you didn’t have a choice in the matter reduces emotional discomfort in the short-term, according to a study in the Journal of Consumer Research. Researchers found that shirking responsibility temporarily relieves feelings of shame, guilt, and fear.

Forced to Be Bad: The Positive Impact of Low-Autonomy Vice Consumption on Consumer Vitality
by Fangyuan Chen, Jaideep Sengupta
Story ImageLifehacker
Don't Be Afraid to Do Things Alone, You'll Have Just as Much Fun
May 14, 2015

When you see someone at the movies alone, you might pity them. Don’t—chances are, they’re enjoying themselves as much as they would be with company. A new study in the Journal of Consumer research suggests people underestimate how much they’ll enjoy doing things by themselves.

Inhibited from Bowling Alone
by Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Story ImageTIME
Research Says You Can Beat Your Cravings With These Two Words
May 13, 2015

When deciding whether to eat something that isn’t necessarily nutritious, use the words “I don’t” instead of “I can’t.” What’s the difference? “With ‘I don’t’ you’re choosing words that signal empowerment and determination rather than ones that signal deprivation. You’re 8 times more likely to be successful.

“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
by Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Story ImageChicago Tribune
Does Color Affect What You Buy?
May 7, 2015

When we see a black/white image, we see the "big picture" by using "high-level" thinking. In a new-car ad, for example, we see fuel efficiency and aerodynamic design. When we see it in color, we use "low-level" thinking and focus on superficial features such as seat color and cup holders.

Monochrome Forests and Colorful Trees: The Effect of Black-and-White versus Color Imagery on Construal Level
by Hyojin Lee, Xiaoyan Deng, H. Rao Unnava, Kentaro Fujita
Story ImageThe Atlantic
The Unexpected Pleasure of Doing Things Alone
May 6, 2015

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research gets at why most people are so reluctant to leave home and do fun things on their own. A series of experiments demonstrated that when it comes to going to the movies or to dinner, individuals consistently think they won’t enjoy themselves as much if they aren’t going with any of their friends.

Inhibited from Bowling Alone
by Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Story ImageCBS News
Why You Should Go Out Solo More Often
May 5, 2015

A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research looks at why many people are anxious going out alone. Researchers find the fear of judgment from strangers plays a big role. But the report also says those who go solo enjoy their time out, just as much as they would with a friend.

Inhibited from Bowling Alone
by Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Story ImageBig Think
For Fear of Being Judged, People Resist Having Experiences Alone
May 3, 2015

People don't like going to a movie or dinner alone. They become frozen by the thought of others judging them — thinking they couldn't find any friends to accompany them is a strong deterrent for missing out on an experience. But the same people will often go to a coffee shop alone to type on their laptop or read a book, and yet these fears of judgment don't apply in these scenarios. Why?

Inhibited from Bowling Alone
by Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Story ImageThe Washington Post
Why You Should Really Start Doing More Things Alone
May 2, 2015

On any given Friday night, bars, restaurants and movie theaters tend to fill up with people spending time with friends, lovers, and family. But when the weekend comes, those who find themselves on their own are likelier to be found on the couch, at home, doing something in private. There's nothing particularly strange here. But maybe we're missing out when we automatically choose to stay in when we don't have social plans.

Inhibited from Bowling Alone
by Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Story ImageThe Guardian
You're the Only Person Who Will Notice If You're Dining Alone. So Enjoy It.
April 28, 2015

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that we’re vastly more comfortable being seen alone doing “utilitarian” things than “hedonic” ones. Perhaps, for instance, you actively love shopping for shoes, you’re unlikely to fear being observed doing it without others. Whereas when it comes to hedonic pursuits, people worry that others will assume they could find no friends to accompany them.

Inhibited from Bowling Alone
by Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Story ImageNew York
Why You Should Go to the Movies (and Do Other Stuff) Alone
April 27, 2015

Would you go to a movie alone? For some people, the question elicits a quick and easy nod — of course! Why not? For others, panic: The idea of sitting there, all alone, surrounded by people who aren’t alone is humiliating. Everyone has different internal guidelines for solo outings, and these guidelines are often marked by a fair degree of irrationality.

Inhibited from Bowling Alone
by Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Story ImageSlate
Ladies, Have Fun by Yourself. Hardly Anyone Is Judging You.
April 27, 2015

A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research shows that people are often afraid to partake in leisure activities solo, mostly because they fear others' assumptions “that they could not find friends to accompany them.” However, when college students were encouraged—over protests—to visit an art museum alone, the solo museum-goers had just as much fun as the people who brought friends.

Inhibited from Bowling Alone
by Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Story ImageThe Atlantic
Against Credit Cards
April 23, 2015

Study after study has documented credit cards’ ability to get people to spend more than they otherwise would: Credit cards make people more likely to forget how much they spent on something. They make frugal people spend recklessly. They make people willing to spend a lot more on one-off purchases. And large credit limits promote the illusion that daily purchases are inconsequential.

Do Payment Mechanisms Change the Way Consumers Perceive Products?
by Promothesh Chatterjee, Randall L. Rose
Story ImageFortune
7 Ways to Trick Yourself into Spending Less
April 23, 2015

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that the physical appearance of money can override the influence of its denomination; subconsciously, people tend to want to get rid of old, worn bills and they take pride in holding onto crisp currency.

Money Isn’t Everything, but It Helps If It Doesn’t Look Used: How the Physical Appearance of Money Influences Spending
by Fabrizio Di Muro, Theodore J. Noseworthy
Story ImageThe Huffington Post
5 Surprising Ways Your Friends Influence You, Backed by Science
April 14, 2015

When people lack adequate social interaction, they're more likely to take bigger risks with money, according to a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research. Researchers discovered people who feel lonely or rejected were most likely to take the biggest financial risks.

Show Me the Honey! Effects of Social Exclusion on Financial Risk-Taking
by Rod Duclos, Echo Wen Wan, Yuwei Jiang
Story ImageTIME
9 Ways to Trick Yourself Into Getting Rich
April 13, 2015

You save more when you feel powerful, even when it’s for a quirky reason. A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that people who had just answered questions while sitting in a tall chair were more likely to save money than those on a low ottoman. A practical takeaway: Consider reserving your major financial chores for “up” days when you are feeling in command.

Money in the Bank: Feeling Powerful Increases Saving
by Emily N. Garbinsky, Anne-Kathrin Klesse, Jennifer L. Aaker
Story ImagePsychology Today
5 Scientific Reasons to Choose Your Friends Wisely
April 10, 2015

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that friends often bond by providing one another with moral support to resist a temptation. However, friends also commonly conspire together to enjoy indulgences. Researchers discovered that when it came to resisting temptations—like eating chocolate—sometimes friends were more likely to become partners in crime as they decided to indulge together.

(Im)moral Support: The Social Outcomes of Parallel Self-Control Decisions
by Michael L. Lowe, Kelly L. Haws
Story ImageCityLab
To Save Lives, Shake Up Traffic Signs
April 8, 2015

Getting accustomed to signs that figuratively spell “danger” could lead to actual danger, and even death. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research takes a look at whether different sorts of signs—specifically, those depicting movement—do a better job of forcing drivers to pay attention to the road.

A Sign of Things to Come: Behavioral Change through Dynamic Iconography
by Luca Cian, Aradhna Krishna, Ryan S. Elder
Story ImageThe Globe and Mail
Is Meat Male? Our Perceptions of Food and Gender
April 7, 2015

A paper published in the Journal of Consumer Research examined cultural and gender associations with meat. They asked people to free-associate about the maleness or femaleness of a range of foods. Turns out, medium-rare steaks, hamburger and beef chili are found to be most male. Sushi, chocolate, chicken salad and peaches are most female.

Is Meat Male? A Quantitative Multimethod Framework to Establish Metaphoric Relationships
by Paul Rozin, Julia M. Hormes, Myles S. Faith, Brian Wansink
Story ImageMedium
Can’t Kick a Bad Habit? You’re Probably Doing It Wrong
April 3, 2015

Recent research reveals why looking at our behaviors can have a profound impact. A study published in the Journal of Consumer Research tested the words people use when confronting temptation. The study authors believe saying “I don’t” rather than “I can’t” provides greater psychological empowerment.

“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
by Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Story ImageMen's Journal
The Real Reason You Can’t Lose Those Last Five Pounds
April 3, 2015

If you can't seem to shave off those last ten pounds in your weight loss goal, marketing researchers might have an idea why: You could be overestimating your progress and underestimating the weight of your bad behavior. That is, you're unconsciously making little progress where you think you've made big strides. According to a new study, it's a pretty common thought process for those trying to lose weight or save money.

The Progress Bias in Goal Pursuit: When One Step Forward Seems Larger than One Step Back
by Margaret C. Campbell, Caleb Warren
Story ImageCNBC
Have Another Bite: Do You Suffer 'Progress Bias'?
April 3, 2015

There's no harm in splurging once in a while, of course. The harm comes when we forget what we've splurged on, but we remember each and every donut we didn't eat. New research suggests we fallible humans often give ourselves outsize credit for all those moments of denial, but fail to properly weight the failures.

The Progress Bias in Goal Pursuit: When One Step Forward Seems Larger than One Step Back
by Margaret C. Campbell, Caleb Warren
Story ImageYahoo! Finance
Is This Why Corporations Donate To Charity?
April 1, 2015

You might not have even heard of the “benevolent halo effect,” but new research shows you’re probably subject to it as a shopper. The effect refers to how hearing about a company’s charitable donations, or corporate social responsibility, impacts consumers’ perception of the quality of the company’s products.

Doing Well by Doing Good: The Benevolent Halo of Corporate Social Responsibility
by Alexander Chernev, Sean Blair
Story ImageEntrepreneur
'Influencer Marketing' on the Rise
April 1, 2015

It’s no surprise that word-of-mouth marketing is effective, but when brand managers combine it with the power of social media, they see greater campaign success, all while spending less money. A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found people on social media often form opinions or make judgments about products and services based on the opinions of those they follow.

Social Defaults: Observed Choices Become Choice Defaults
by Young Eun Huh, Joachim Vosgerau, Carey K. Morewedge
Story ImageThe Huffington Post
The TIDAL Wave That Wouldn't Turn
March 31, 2015

One central takeaway from a longitudinal study published in the Journal of Consumer Research is that two arguments -- artist fairness and sound quality -- never resonate with consumers nearly as much as artists would like them to. The key lies in understanding how market institutions shape market actor roles.

Conflict and Compromise: Drama in Marketplace Evolution
by Markus Giesler
Story ImageInc.
Can't Kick a Bad Habit? You're Doing It Wrong
March 31, 2015

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research tested the words people use when confronting temptation. When people finished the study, they were offered either a chocolate bar or granola bar to thank them for their time. While 39% of people who used the words "I can't" chose the granola, 64% of those in the "I don't" group picked it over chocolate.

“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
by Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Story ImagePacific Standard
Will the Web Kill Nostalgia?
March 31, 2015

A recent article published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that nostalgia decreases people’s desire for money precisely because it increases feelings of social connection, and therefore feelings of security and stability. This effect is presumably why brands so frequently use nostalgia to pry money from people’s wallets.

Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
by Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Story ImageDiscovery News
10 Food Tricks That Fool Our Perception
March 27, 2015

A Journal of Consumer Research study found that consumers believe foods that are hard to chew and have rough textures are healthier than those that are softer, yet made from the exact same ingredients. This is one reason why certain energy bars, granola bars, cereals and more might be full of calories and unhealthy ingredients, yet consumers still think of them as being healthy.

Something to Chew On: The Effects of Oral Haptics on Mastication, Orosensory Perception, and Calorie Estimation
by Dipayan Biswas, Courtney Szocs, Aradhna Krishna, Donald R. Lehmann
Browse and Search the Publicity Archive »
Press Releases »
DateNews ItemArticle Mentioned
May 22Risk Factor: Penny wise, pound foolish
Financial Chronicle India
The Denomination Effect
Priya Raghubir and Joydeep Srivastava
May 22Beware Of These Pricing Tricks Retailers Use To Fool Your Brain
Lifehacker Australia
Price Endings, Left-Digit Effects, and Choice
Kenneth C. Manning, David E. Sprott
May 22Beware of These Pricing Tricks Retailers Use to Fool Your Brain
LifeHacker India
Price Endings, Left-Digit Effects, and Choice
Kenneth C. Manning, David E. Sprott
May 22Strange but True: A smile can change your attitude
Berkshire Eagle
From Firm Muscles to Firm Willpower: Understanding the Role of Embodied Cognition in Self-Regulation
Iris W. Hung, Aparna A. Labroo
May 20Need to study? Concentrate on coffee shops
Roanoke Times
Is Noise Always Bad? Exploring the Effects of Ambient Noise on Creative Cognition
Ravi Mehta, Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Amar Cheema
May 19(Don't wanna be) All by myself: Why we hate doing things alone
89.3 KPCC
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 185 Proven Hacks To Increase Self-Control
Yahoo! Parenting
“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
May 15Study: Going solo actually fun
The Columbian
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 13The Science Behind Why It's More Fun To Do Things Alone
YourTango
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 13Goodbye ‘Mad Men,’ Hello Grief
Technology.Org
When Narrative Brands End: The Impact of Narrative Closure and Consumption Sociality on Loss Accommodation
Cristel Antonia Russell, Hope Jensen Schau
May 12People Who Don’t Do Stuff Alone Are Missing Out
Role Reboot
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 12Why I love spending time alone
Mother Nature News
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 12It's OK to go out for fun on your own
The Journal Gazette
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 9Why it's often more enjoyable to do things alone
Business Insider
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 8People Who Don't Do Stuff Alone Are Missing Out
The Huffington Post
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 8Comment: The unexpected pleasure of doing things alone
SBS Australia
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 7Why You Should Go to the Movies (and Do Other Stuff) Alone
Yahoo! Parenting
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 6The Best Websites to Help You Fall Asleep
TIME
Is Noise Always Bad? Exploring the Effects of Ambient Noise on Creative Cognition
Ravi Mehta, Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Amar Cheema
May 5How drinking water and high heels affect your shopping binges
The Economic Times
Money Isn’t Everything, but It Helps If It Doesn’t Look Used: How the Physical Appearance of Money Influences Spending
Fabrizio Di Muro, Theodore J. Noseworthy
May 5Despite Breaking My Leg, I Don't Regret Skiing Alone
CBS Local Denver
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 4Addicted to shopping? Researchers claim full bladder and high heels can help
India TV News
Money Isn’t Everything, but It Helps If It Doesn’t Look Used: How the Physical Appearance of Money Influences Spending
Fabrizio Di Muro, Theodore J. Noseworthy
May 4There's nothing wrong with a night out alone
The Bulletin
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 410 tricks to spend less while shopping and beat that urge
The Economic Times
Money Isn’t Everything, but It Helps If It Doesn’t Look Used: How the Physical Appearance of Money Influences Spending
Fabrizio Di Muro, Theodore J. Noseworthy
May 4Why You Should Do More Things Alone
Toronto Star
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 4The Case for Doing More Things Alone
Esquire
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 410 tricks to spend less while shopping and beat that urge
The Economic Times
Money Isn’t Everything, but It Helps If It Doesn’t Look Used: How the Physical Appearance of Money Influences Spending
Fabrizio Di Muro, Theodore J. Noseworthy
May 45 Reasons You Should Party Alone
Cosmopolitan
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
May 4How drinking water and high heels affect your shopping binges
The Economic Times
Money Isn’t Everything, but It Helps If It Doesn’t Look Used: How the Physical Appearance of Money Influences Spending
Fabrizio Di Muro, Theodore J. Noseworthy
May 4Study: Going Out Alone More Fund Than You Think
Valley News
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Apr 30Could this be the real reason you have trouble losing weight or saving money?
Bob Sullivan.net
The Progress Bias in Goal Pursuit: When One Step Forward Seems Larger than One Step Back
Margaret C. Campbell, Caleb Warren
Apr 28Oprah Winfrey Fans Pay $313 for Wastebasket
Guardian Liberty Voice
Celebrity Contagion and the Value of Objects
George E. Newman, Gil Diesendruck and Paul Bloom
Apr 27Women have more desire for variety when ovulating, study shows
Shine (Yahoo! Canada)
Playing the Field: The Effect of Fertility on Women’s Desire for Variety
Kristina M. Durante, Ashley Rae Arsena
Apr 21Too much stuff: We collect it all our lives, and then what?
Waterbury Republican American
When Wanting Is Better than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process
Marsha L. Richins
Apr 21Too much stuff: We collect it all our lives, and then what?
Waterbury Republican American
When Wanting Is Better than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process
Marsha L. Richins
Apr 21Too much stuff: We collect it all our lives, and then what?
Waterbury Republican American
When Wanting Is Better than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process
Marsha L. Richins
Apr 21Too much stuff: We collect it all our lives, and then what?
Waterbury Republican American
When Wanting Is Better than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process
Marsha L. Richins
Apr 20Study hints at how the brain construes colour objects versus black and white
domain-B
Monochrome Forests and Colorful Trees: The Effect of Black-and-White versus Color Imagery on Construal Level
Hyojin Lee, Xiaoyan Deng, H. Rao Unnava, Kentaro Fujita
Apr 15Ethical halos: Is there an additional value to CSR activities?
FoodNavigator.com
Doing Well by Doing Good: The Benevolent Halo of Corporate Social Responsibility
Alexander Chernev, Sean Blair
Apr 15Can a Desire to Conform Convince Water-Wasters to Slash Usage?
East Bay Express
A Room with a Viewpoint: Using Social Norms to Motivate Environmental Conservation in Hotels
Noah J. Goldstein, Robert B. Cialdini, Vladas Griskevicius
Apr 134 Smart Tips for Working with Online Influencers
Tech Cocktail
Social Defaults: Observed Choices Become Choice Defaults
Young Eun Huh, Joachim Vosgerau, Carey K. Morewedge
Apr 10We collect stuff all our lives, and then what?
When Wanting Is Better than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process
Marsha L. Richins
Apr 10Your ultimate guide to giving feedback that doesn’t suck
The Next Web
Tell Me What I Did Wrong: Experts Seek and Respond to Negative Feedback
Stacey R. Finkelstein, Ayelet Fishbach
Apr 10We collect stuff all our lives, and then what?
Gazettextra
When Wanting Is Better than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process
Marsha L. Richins
Apr 10Too much stuff: We collect it all our lives, and then what?
Fredericksburg.com
When Wanting Is Better than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process
Marsha L. Richins
Apr 9How Gratitude Beats Materialism
Greater Good: University of California Berkeley
A Consumer Values Orientation for Materialism and Its Measurement: Scale Development and Validation
Marsha L. Richins, Scott Dawson
Apr 8UC Research Suggests Daydreaming Might Push Consumers to Spend Beyond Their Means
University of Cincinnati
Attention Modes and Price Importance: How Experiencing and Mind-Wandering Influence the Prioritization of Changeable Stimuli
Ryan Rahinel, Rohini Ahluwalia
Apr 8Daydreaming Might Push Consumers to Spend Beyond Their Means
Science Blog
Attention Modes and Price Importance: How Experiencing and Mind-Wandering Influence the Prioritization of Changeable Stimuli
Ryan Rahinel, Rohini Ahluwalia
Apr 7Independent people buy things that make less sense
The Free Press
“I” Follow My Heart and “We” Rely on Reasons: The Impact of Self-Construal on Reliance on Feelings versus Reasons in Decision Making
Jiewen Hong, Hannah H. Chang
Apr 5How does fertility affect women's desire for variety in products?
Medical News Today
Playing the Field: The Effect of Fertility on Women’s Desire for Variety
Kristina M. Durante, Ashley Rae Arsena
Apr 4Too much stuff: We collect it all our lives -- then what?
Walla Walla Union-Bulletin
When Wanting Is Better than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process
Marsha L. Richins
Apr 4Waarom de tijd soms zo tergend traag vooruit gaat
Het Nieuwsblad
Timeflow: How Consumption Practices Shape Consumers’ Temporal Experiences
Niklas Woermann, Joonas Rokka
Apr 4Waarom de tijd soms zo tergend traag vooruit gaat
Gazet van Antwerpen
Timeflow: How Consumption Practices Shape Consumers’ Temporal Experiences
Niklas Woermann, Joonas Rokka
Apr 4Too much stuff: We collect it all our lives, and then what?
The Southern
When Wanting Is Better than Having: Materialism, Transformation Expectations, and Product-Evoked Emotions in the Purchase Process
Marsha L. Richins
Apr 3Patience and foresight can help you save money
The Economic Times
To Know and to Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Spending
Daniel M. Bartels, Oleg Urminsky
Apr 3Independent people buy things that make less sense
newKerala
“I” Follow My Heart and “We” Rely on Reasons: The Impact of Self-Construal on Reliance on Feelings versus Reasons in Decision Making
Jiewen Hong, Hannah H. Chang
Apr 25 of the Best Ways to Spend Your Money and Not Regret It
Food & Wine
“The Time vs. Money Effect”: Shifting Product Attitudes and Decisions through Personal Connection
Cassie Mogilner, Jennifer Aaker
Apr 2Do consumers think products are better when companies donate to charity?
Medical News Today
Doing Well by Doing Good: The Benevolent Halo of Corporate Social Responsibility
Alexander Chernev, Sean Blair
Apr 2Getting the message across: Can active symbols on road signs save lives?
Medical News Today
A Sign of Things to Come: Behavioral Change through Dynamic Iconography
Luca Cian, Aradhna Krishna, Ryan S. Elder
Apr 1Sometimes products benefit from mixed reviews
Science Codex
Why Is the Crowd Divided? Attribution for Dispersion in Online Word of Mouth
Stephen X. He, Samuel D. Bond
Apr 1Saving Money: Do Consumers Spend Less If They Think About the Future?
Science NewsLine
To Know and to Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Spending
Daniel M. Bartels, Oleg Urminsky
Apr 1A Matter of Taste: When Do Products Benefit from Mixed Reviews?
Science NewsLine
Why Is the Crowd Divided? Attribution for Dispersion in Online Word of Mouth
Stephen X. He, Samuel D. Bond
Apr 1Do Consumers Think Products Are Better When Companies Donate to Charity?
Science NewsLine
Doing Well by Doing Good: The Benevolent Halo of Corporate Social Responsibility
Alexander Chernev, Sean Blair
Apr 1How Are Ordinary Consumers Transforming the Fashion Business?
Science NewsLine
Refashioning a Field? Connected Consumers and Institutional Dynamics in Markets
Pierre-Yann Dolbec, Eileen Fischer
Apr 1How Does Fertility Affect Women's Desire for Variety in Products?
Science NewsLine
Playing the Field: The Effect of Fertility on Women’s Desire for Variety
Kristina M. Durante, Ashley Rae Arsena
Apr 1When Are Consumers More Likely to Rely on Feelings to Make Decisions?
Science NewsLine
“I” Follow My Heart and “We” Rely on Reasons: The Impact of Self-Construal on Reliance on Feelings versus Reasons in Decision Making
Jiewen Hong, Hannah H. Chang
Apr 1Cultivating Timeflow: Can Consumers Shape How They Experience Time?
Science NewsLine
Timeflow: How Consumption Practices Shape Consumers’ Temporal Experiences
Niklas Woermann, Joonas Rokka
Apr 1Getting the Message Across: Can Active Symbols on Road Signs Save Lives?
Science NewsLine
A Sign of Things to Come: Behavioral Change through Dynamic Iconography
Luca Cian, Aradhna Krishna, Ryan S. Elder
Apr 1Consumer Social Media Opinions Influencing Brand Perceptions
Marketing & Social Media News
Social Defaults: Observed Choices Become Choice Defaults
Young Eun Huh, Joachim Vosgerau, Carey K. Morewedge
Apr 1Is This Why Corporations Donate To Charity?
Money Talks News
Doing Well by Doing Good: The Benevolent Halo of Corporate Social Responsibility
Alexander Chernev, Sean Blair
Apr 1The Surprising Reason Why Men Make Stupid Financial Decisions
The Cheat Sheet
Show Me the Honey! Effects of Social Exclusion on Financial Risk-Taking
Rod Duclos, Echo Wen Wan, Yuwei Jiang
Apr 1When are consumers more likely to rely on feelings to make decisions?
PsyPost
“I” Follow My Heart and “We” Rely on Reasons: The Impact of Self-Construal on Reliance on Feelings versus Reasons in Decision Making
Jiewen Hong, Hannah H. Chang
Apr 1Patience and foresight can help you save money
Yahoo! News India
To Know and to Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Spending
Daniel M. Bartels, Oleg Urminsky
Apr 1Fertile women shop hard to woo the best man
Yahoo! News India
Playing the Field: The Effect of Fertility on Women’s Desire for Variety
Kristina M. Durante, Ashley Rae Arsena
Apr 1Fertile women shop hard to woo the best man
Jagran Post
Playing the Field: The Effect of Fertility on Women’s Desire for Variety
Kristina M. Durante, Ashley Rae Arsena
Apr 1Here's why it is so hard for consumers to save money
ANI News
To Know and to Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Spending
Daniel M. Bartels, Oleg Urminsky
Apr 1Patience and foresight can help you save money
Jagran Post
To Know and to Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Spending
Daniel M. Bartels, Oleg Urminsky
Apr 1Fertile women shop hard to woo the best man
Business Standard
Playing the Field: The Effect of Fertility on Women’s Desire for Variety
Kristina M. Durante, Ashley Rae Arsena
Apr 1Consumers Spend Less When They Think About The Future
University Herald
To Know and to Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Spending
Daniel M. Bartels, Oleg Urminsky
Apr 1Patience and foresight can help you save money
Daijiworld.com
To Know and to Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Spending
Daniel M. Bartels, Oleg Urminsky
Mar 31Do consumers think products are better when companies donate to charity?
EurekAlert!
Doing Well by Doing Good: The Benevolent Halo of Corporate Social Responsibility
Alexander Chernev, Sean Blair
Mar 31How are ordinary consumers transforming the fashion business?
Phys.Org
Refashioning a Field? Connected Consumers and Institutional Dynamics in Markets
Pierre-Yann Dolbec, Eileen Fischer
Mar 31When are consumers more likely to rely on feelings to make decisions?
Phys.Org
“I” Follow My Heart and “We” Rely on Reasons: The Impact of Self-Construal on Reliance on Feelings versus Reasons in Decision Making
Jiewen Hong, Hannah H. Chang
Mar 31Saving money: Do consumers spend less if they think about the future?
Phys.Org
To Know and to Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Spending
Daniel M. Bartels, Oleg Urminsky
Mar 31Getting the message across: Can active symbols on road signs save lives?
Phys.Org
A Sign of Things to Come: Behavioral Change through Dynamic Iconography
Luca Cian, Aradhna Krishna, Ryan S. Elder
Mar 31A matter of taste: When do products benefit from mixed reviews?
Phys.Org
Why Is the Crowd Divided? Attribution for Dispersion in Online Word of Mouth
Stephen X. He, Samuel D. Bond
Mar 31Do consumers think products are better when companies donate to charity?
Science Daily
Doing Well by Doing Good: The Benevolent Halo of Corporate Social Responsibility
Alexander Chernev, Sean Blair
Mar 31A matter of taste: When do products benefit from mixed reviews?
Science Daily
Why Is the Crowd Divided? Attribution for Dispersion in Online Word of Mouth
Stephen X. He, Samuel D. Bond
Mar 31How are ordinary consumers transforming the fashion business?
Science Daily
Refashioning a Field? Connected Consumers and Institutional Dynamics in Markets
Pierre-Yann Dolbec, Eileen Fischer
Mar 31When are consumers more likely to rely on feelings to make decisions?
Science Daily
“I” Follow My Heart and “We” Rely on Reasons: The Impact of Self-Construal on Reliance on Feelings versus Reasons in Decision Making
Jiewen Hong, Hannah H. Chang
Mar 31Saving money: Do consumers spend less if they think about the future?
Science Daily
To Know and to Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Spending
Daniel M. Bartels, Oleg Urminsky
Mar 31Cultivating timeflow: Can consumers shape how they experience time?
Science Daily
Timeflow: How Consumption Practices Shape Consumers’ Temporal Experiences
Niklas Woermann, Joonas Rokka
Mar 31How are ordinary consumers transforming the fashion business?
EurekAlert!
Refashioning a Field? Connected Consumers and Institutional Dynamics in Markets
Pierre-Yann Dolbec, Eileen Fischer
Mar 31How does fertility affect women's desire for variety in products?
EurekAlert!
Playing the Field: The Effect of Fertility on Women’s Desire for Variety
Kristina M. Durante, Ashley Rae Arsena
Mar 31Cultivating timeflow: Can consumers shape how they experience time?
Phys.Org
Timeflow: How Consumption Practices Shape Consumers’ Temporal Experiences
Niklas Woermann, Joonas Rokka
Mar 31When are consumers more likely to rely on feelings to make decisions?
EurekAlert!
“I” Follow My Heart and “We” Rely on Reasons: The Impact of Self-Construal on Reliance on Feelings versus Reasons in Decision Making
Jiewen Hong, Hannah H. Chang
Mar 31Saving money: Do consumers spend less if they think about the future?
EurekAlert!
To Know and to Care: How Awareness and Valuation of the Future Jointly Shape Consumer Spending
Daniel M. Bartels, Oleg Urminsky
Mar 31Do consumers think products are better when companies donate to charity?
Phys.Org
Doing Well by Doing Good: The Benevolent Halo of Corporate Social Responsibility
Alexander Chernev, Sean Blair
Mar 31A matter of taste: When do products benefit from mixed reviews?
EurekAlert!
Why Is the Crowd Divided? Attribution for Dispersion in Online Word of Mouth
Stephen X. He, Samuel D. Bond
Mar 31How does fertility affect women's desire for variety in products?
Phys.Org
Playing the Field: The Effect of Fertility on Women’s Desire for Variety
Kristina M. Durante, Ashley Rae Arsena
Mar 31Cultivating timeflow: Can consumers shape how they experience time?
EurekAlert!
Timeflow: How Consumption Practices Shape Consumers’ Temporal Experiences
Niklas Woermann, Joonas Rokka
Mar 31Getting the message across: Can active symbols on road signs save lives?
EurekAlert!
A Sign of Things to Come: Behavioral Change through Dynamic Iconography
Luca Cian, Aradhna Krishna, Ryan S. Elder
Mar 30How to Raise a Kid Who's Not Materialistic
Ceylon Daily News
Material Parenting: How the Use of Goods in Parenting Fosters Materialism in the Next Generation
Marsha L. Richins, Lan Nguyen Chaplin
Mar 30Procrastination Could Lead to Heart Disease
Shape Magazine
The Categorization of Time and Its Impact on Task Initiation
Yanping Tu, Dilip Soman
Mar 28Dieting? Be careful – You Might be Setting Yourself Up for Failure
WBAY TV
The Progress Bias in Goal Pursuit: When One Step Forward Seems Larger than One Step Back
Margaret C. Campbell, Caleb Warren
Mar 27Borderfree : Localized Pricing That Hits the Sweet Spot
4-traders.com
This Number Just Feels Right: The Impact of Roundedness of Price Numbers on Product Evaluations
Monica Wadhwa, Kuangjie Zhang
Mar 26Why casual clothing is the ultimate status symbol
Business Insider
The Red Sneakers Effect: Inferring Status and Competence from Signals of Nonconformity
Silvia Bellezza, Francesca Gino, Anat Keinan
Mar 26How to Raise a Down-to-Earth Kid, According to Science
Redbook
Material Parenting: How the Use of Goods in Parenting Fosters Materialism in the Next Generation
Marsha L. Richins, Lan Nguyen Chaplin
Mar 26How to Raise a Kid Who's Not Materialistic
Yahoo! Parenting
Material Parenting: How the Use of Goods in Parenting Fosters Materialism in the Next Generation
Marsha L. Richins, Lan Nguyen Chaplin
Mar 26When Close To Reaching A Goal, People Feel Busier
University Herald
Pardon the Interruption: Goal Proximity, Perceived Spare Time, and Impatience
Ji Hoon Jhang, John G. Lynch Jr.
Mar 26Battle of the mayoral political ads
RedEye Chicago
Confirmation and the Effects of Valenced Political Advertising: A Field Experiment
Joan M. Phillips, Joel E. Urbany, Thomas J. Reynolds
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