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Black Friday: The Dark Side of Scarcity Promotions
November 25, 2016

Does simply encountering a scarcity promotion, such as a newspaper or television advertisement or online pop-up ad, cultivate seeds of aggressive behavior in consumers and predispose them to act in a violent manner? Is marketplace aggression not merely the outcome of crowds during shopping holidays, but activated beforehand at ad exposure?

The Dark Side of Scarcity Promotions: How Exposure to Limited-Quantity Promotions Can Induce Aggression
by Kirk Kristofferson, Brent McFerran, Andrea C. Morales, Darren W. Dahl
Story ImageChicago Tribune
Retailers Prep to Keep the Peace on Black Friday
November 23, 2016

If the thought of talking politics with family over Thanksgiving dinner already has your blood boiling, take a few deep breaths and back away from the Black Friday ads. Just looking at ads that hype a hot deal on a limited supply of items can shorten consumers' fuses, found a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research.

The Dark Side of Scarcity Promotions: How Exposure to Limited-Quantity Promotions Can Induce Aggression
by Kirk Kristofferson, Brent McFerran, Andrea C. Morales, Darren W. Dahl
Story ImageQuartz
Google's Former Happiness Guru Developed a Three-Second Brain Exercise for Finding Joy
October 27, 2016

A study published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that older people are more likely to define who they are by naming everyday positive moments. Those in their teens and twenties cited extraordinary moments, such as graduation or a first car, as defining.

Happiness from Ordinary and Extraordinary Experiences
by Amit Bhattacharjee, Cassie Mogilner
Story ImageBoston Globe
Give Me the Short Version
October 16, 2016

Pharmaceutical ads warn of every possible side effect. Don’t feel sorry for the drug companies, though. A new study finds that highlighting multiple risks can trick people into downplaying the overall risk. People who read that a hypertension drug may increase the chance of seizures had a lower opinion of the drug than if they read that the drug may increase the chance of seizures, congestion, fatigue, and so on, because they assumed the chance of seizures (the most worrisome side effect) was lower when other (minor) side effects were mentioned.

Risk (Mis)Perception: When Greater Risk Reduces Risk Valuation
by Uzma Khan, Daniella M. Kupor
Story ImageFast Company
The Right (and Wrong) Way to Harness Your Company\'s Underdog Status
October 15, 2016

Market research has shown that consumers may be more likely to identify with the brands perceived as underdogs. Harvard Business School professor Anat Keinan has observed that effective underdog narratives inspire and give hope to customers. In a 2011 study she coauthored for the Journal of Consumer Research, Keinan found that brands that persevere in the face of relatively disadvantaged market positions tend to hold an outsized appeal.

$29 for 70 Items or 70 Items for $29? How Presentation Order Affects Package Perceptions
by Rajesh Bagchi, Derick F. Davis
Story ImageNext City
Baltimore and L.A. to Test New Small Business Program
October 14, 2016

In a 2014 study on minority entrepreneurs and consumers that was published in the Journal of Consumer Research, researchers conducted a study with black, Hispanic and white entrepreneurs that showed bank customer service reps were more likely to immediately engage white entrepreneurs with information about loan packages. Minority entrepreneurs, however, were more likely to first get prompted with questions about their financial background, and in some cases didn’t even make it as far as getting a business card.

Rejected, Shackled, and Alone: The Impact of Systemic Restricted Choice on Minority Consumers’ Construction of Self
by Sterling A. Bone, Glenn L. Christensen, Jerome D. Williams
Story ImageMother Nature Network
Will You Recycle a Cup If Your Name Is on It?
October 11, 2016

When you go to a coffee shop and the barista writes your name on the cup, you're more likely to recycle it than if your name was misspelled or wasn't written on the cup at all. That's just one of several interesting recycling behaviors marketing researchers recently uncovered. It turns out we have fascinating biases that help determine what we recycle and what we just toss in the trash.

The Recycled Self: Consumers' Disposal Decisions of Identity-Linked Products
by Remi Trudel, Jennifer J. Argo, Matthew D. Meng
Story ImageThe Atlantic
How Voters Respond to Electoral Defeat
October 11, 2016

How can you avoid the pain of backing a loser? You could simply stay home on Election Day (the Canadian website’s nagging about voting be damned). Indeed, one body of research on decision making suggests that when you don’t care for your options, abstaining may be your best bet: Whether a choice is trivial (deciding between disliked pasta dishes, say) or serious (taking a baby off life support), people are most at peace with a negative outcome when they didn’t choose it themselves.

Tragic Choices: Autonomy and Emotional Responses to Medical Decisions
by Simona Botti, Kristina Orfali, Sheena S. Iyengar
Story ImageOutside Magazine
What Brands Can Learn from Patagonia's Gender-Neutral Marketing
October 10, 2016

When it comes to being green, men have a problem. A recent series of studies led by a Utah State University business professor found that greenness carries a feminine connotation among both male and female consumers, which researchers believe plays a role in the well-documented notion that women are more environmentally conscious than men. “Consumers who engage in green behaviors are stereotyped by others as more feminine and even perceive themselves as more feminine,” says the report, published in the Journal of Consumer Research. “This green-feminine stereotype may motivate men to avoid green behaviors in order to preserve a macho image.”

Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
by Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Story ImageBoston Globe
Aggress Now While Supplies Last
October 7, 2016

Researchers found that simply exposing people to an ad for a steeply discounted product in limited supply (e.g., a new iPhone for only $50, but only three are available!) raised their testosterone levels and subsequently caused them to fire more shots or throw more punches in a video game, or behave more aggressively toward a vending machine that broke. There was no such effect for time-limited sales (one day only!), higher-class stores (Nordstrom vs. Walmart), or if people were made to think of how they were similar to fellow customers.

The Dark Side of Scarcity Promotions: How Exposure to Limited-Quantity Promotions Can Induce Aggression
by Kirk Kristofferson, Brent McFerran, Andrea C. Morales, Darren W. Dahl
Story ImageBloomberg
Could This Sleek Device Get You to Spend Less?
October 6, 2016

Paying with cash causes physical discomfort, according to a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, but it also makes people feel a closer connection to whatever they’ve purchased. Researchers told subjects that a coffee mug was worth $6.95, then sold it to them for $2. When the researchers asked to buy back the mug, people who had paid by credit card asked for an average of $3.83, while those who had used cash demanded $6.71.

'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
by Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Story ImageQuartz
A Psychologist Has Honed a Subliminal Tactic to Get What You Want before You’ve Asked for It
October 5, 2016

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research tested the value of asking consumers for advice by showing survey takers a description of a business plan for a new (fictional) fast-casual restaurant. Participants who were asked for "advice" regarding the restaurant reported wanting to eat at a Splash! restaurant significantly more than participants who were asked either for any “opinions” or “expectations” they might have.

Bringing Us Together or Driving Us Apart: The Effect of Soliciting Consumer Input on Consumers’ Propensity to Transact with an Organization
by Wendy Liu, David Gal
Story ImageSalon
Hold Your Nose and Choose: How Do You Vote When You Don’t Like Either Candidate?
September 30, 2016

Behavioral scientists have studied decision-making –- including voting -– for decades. However, researchers usually give respondents at least one appealing option to choose from. This led us to wonder: What do voters do when they consider all of the options bad? Do they fall back on party affiliation, or simply toss a coin?

Take It or Leave It: How Choosing versus Rejecting Alternatives Affects Information Processing
by Tatiana Sokolova, Aradhna Krishna
Story ImageBig Think
Why Feeling Our Currency Might Make Us More Responsible with It
September 27, 2016

If we could feel how much money weighed, would we spend less of it? The largest issue is Americans’ tendency to spend ourselves into debt rather than save. The single biggest contributor to that debt may be the fact that most Americans use digital money rather than cash. A November 2015 study in the Journal of Consumer Research reveals that people assign greater value to items they purchase with cash.

'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
by Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Story ImageHarvard Business Review
Men Choose Differently When They Choose with Other Men
September 14, 2016

We make a lot of joint decisions on a daily basis. Whether choosing to buy a car or house with your spouse, making business decisions with your coworkers, or simply deciding where to have dinner with a friend, we constantly find ourselves having to make choices with others. But when choosing jointly, are we likely to make the same choices we would if we were alone? Our research suggests the answer may depend on the gender composition of the group.

Men and the Middle: Gender Differences in Dyadic Compromise Effects
by Hristina Nikolova, Cait Lamberton
Story ImageThe Washington Post
A MAD Magazine Cartoonist Shows How Growing up Poor Sparks Creativity
September 7, 2016

In a recent Journal of Consumer Research study, Meng Zhu and Ravi Mehta wrote: “Contrary to popular belief, abundant resources may have a negative effect on creativity.” They continued: “We found that scarcity forces consumers to think beyond the traditional function of a given product and enhances creativity.”

Creating When You Have Less: The Impact of Resource Scarcity on Product Use Creativity
by Ravi Mehta, Meng Zhu
Browse and Search the Publicity Archive »
DateNews ItemArticle Mentioned
Nov 30The Color of the Plate Matters
Baraboo News Republic
Plate Size and Color Suggestibility: The Delboeuf Illusion’s Bias on Serving and Eating Behavior
Koert Van Ittersum, Brian Wansink
Nov 28Bespoke Flooring Can Slow Speedy Shoppers, New Research Shows
Retail Times
Altering Speed of Locomotion
Bram Van Den Bergh, Nico Heuvinck, Gaby A. C. Schellekens, Iris Vermeir
Nov 285 Sanity-Saving Tips for Holiday Shopping
Real Simple
Overindividuation in Gift Giving: Shopping for Multiple Recipients Leads Givers to Choose Unique but Less Preferred Gifts
Mary Steffel, Robyn A. LeBoeuf
Nov 25Pushing and Shoving for a Black Friday Deal? That's Only Natural, Study Suggests
CTV News
The Dark Side of Scarcity Promotions: How Exposure to Limited-Quantity Promotions Can Induce Aggression
Kirk Kristofferson, Brent McFerran, Andrea C. Morales, Darren W. Dahl
Nov 25You may get punched while shopping on Black Friday
Austin Business Journal
The Dark Side of Scarcity Promotions: How Exposure to Limited-Quantity Promotions Can Induce Aggression
Kirk Kristofferson, Brent McFerran, Andrea C. Morales, Darren W. Dahl
Nov 18The Common Money Habit That Could Be Costing You Thousands
M2woman New Zealand
Do Payment Mechanisms Change the Way Consumers Perceive Products?
Promothesh Chatterjee, Randall L. Rose
Nov 17Ditching This Common Spending Habit Could Save You Thousands
M2
Do Payment Mechanisms Change the Way Consumers Perceive Products?
Promothesh Chatterjee, Randall L. Rose
Nov 15ASU Team Researches Why Shoppers Become Black Friday Brawlers
Arizona State University: ASU Now
The Dark Side of Scarcity Promotions: How Exposure to Limited-Quantity Promotions Can Induce Aggression
Kirk Kristofferson, Brent McFerran, Andrea C. Morales, Darren W. Dahl
Nov 15Trash That Soda Can, Trash Yourself
Science Daily
The Recycled Self: Consumers' Disposal Decisions of Identity-Linked Products
Remi Trudel, Jennifer J. Argo, Matthew D. Meng
Nov 14Trash That Pop Can, Trash Yourself
Phys.Org
The Recycled Self: Consumers' Disposal Decisions of Identity-Linked Products
Remi Trudel, Jennifer J. Argo, Matthew D. Meng
Nov 5The Scientific Reason Aging Millennials Can't Quit the '90s
Bustle
The Temporal and Focal Dynamics of Volitional Reconsumption: A Phenomenological Investigation of Repeated Hedonic Experiences
Cristel Antonia Russell, Sidney J. Levy
Nov 45 Emotional Biases that Are Hazardous to Your Wealth
NASDAQ.com
Focusing on the Forgone: How Value Can Appear So Different to Buyers and Sellers
Ziv Carmon, Dan Ariely
Oct 27Five things clothing stores do to trick you into buying more
News24 South Africa
Should the Devil Sell Prada? Retail Rejection Increases Aspiring Consumers' Desire for the Brand
Morgan K. Ward, Darren W. Dahl
Oct 21Are Doctors Giving Too Many Kids Growth Hormones?
Futurity.org
To Prescribe or Not to Prescribe? Consumer Access to Life-Enhancing Products
Detelina Marinova, Irina V. Kozlenkova, Leona Cuttler, J. B. Silvers
Oct 20The psychology behind why that smashed avocado costs $22
Stuff.co.nz
This Number Just Feels Right: The Impact of Roundedness of Price Numbers on Product Evaluations
Monica Wadhwa, Kuangjie Zhang
Oct 20To Prescribe or Not to Prescribe?
MSU Today
To Prescribe or Not to Prescribe? Consumer Access to Life-Enhancing Products
Detelina Marinova, Irina V. Kozlenkova, Leona Cuttler, J. B. Silvers
Oct 20To Prescribe or Not to Prescribe?
Phys.Org
To Prescribe or Not to Prescribe? Consumer Access to Life-Enhancing Products
Detelina Marinova, Irina V. Kozlenkova, Leona Cuttler, J. B. Silvers
Oct 20To Prescribe or Not to Prescribe?
Science Daily
To Prescribe or Not to Prescribe? Consumer Access to Life-Enhancing Products
Detelina Marinova, Irina V. Kozlenkova, Leona Cuttler, J. B. Silvers
Oct 19As Cold Arrives Keep Warm with 'Chick Flicks' and 'Rom Coms'
Alaska Star
Warm It Up With Love: The Effect of Physical Coldness on Liking of Romance Movies
Jiewen Hong, Yacheng Sun
Oct 18How to Beat Your Brain in the Supermarket
The New Daily
Adding Asymmetrically Dominated Alternatives: Violations of Regularity and the Similarity Hypothesis
Joel Huber, John W. Payne, Christopher Puto
Oct 17How Music Affects Your Brain (Plus 11 Artists To Listen to at Work)
Medium
Is Noise Always Bad? Exploring the Effects of Ambient Noise on Creative Cognition
Ravi Mehta, Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Amar Cheema
Oct 115 Proven Ways to Be a Great Conversationalist and Avoid Awkward Silence
Medical Daily
What's in a Name? A Complimentary Means of Persuasion
Daniel J. Howard, Charles Gengler, Ambuj Jain
Oct 10Vegetables Will Replace Meat by 2020 and Millennials Are Driving the Shift
The New York Observer
If It's Useful and You Know It, Do You Eat? Preschoolers Refrain from Instrumental Food
Michal Maimaran, Ayelet Fishbach
Oct 5Marketing Scholar Investigates Psychological Effects of Logo Design
Phys.Org
When Brand Logos Describe the Environment: Design Instability and the Utility of Safety-Oriented Products
Ryan Rahinel, Noelle M. Nelson
Oct 4Marketing Scholar Investigates Psychological Effects of Logo Design
University of Kansas
When Brand Logos Describe the Environment: Design Instability and the Utility of Safety-Oriented Products
Ryan Rahinel, Noelle M. Nelson
Oct 3The Consumer Psychology Behind the Pumpkin Spice Latte
The Content Standard by Skyword
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Sep 30Why We Prize Authenticity, but Buy Something Else
Phys.Org
What Wins Awards Is Not Always What I Buy: How Creative Control Affects Authenticity and Thus Recognition (But Not Liking)
Francesca Valsesia, Joseph C. Nunes, Andrea Ordanini
Sep 29Why We Prize Authenticity, but Buy Something Else
AlphaGalileo
What Wins Awards Is Not Always What I Buy: How Creative Control Affects Authenticity and Thus Recognition (But Not Liking)
Francesca Valsesia, Joseph C. Nunes, Andrea Ordanini
Sep 29Why We Prize Authenticity, but Buy Something Else
Science Daily
What Wins Awards Is Not Always What I Buy: How Creative Control Affects Authenticity and Thus Recognition (But Not Liking)
Francesca Valsesia, Joseph C. Nunes, Andrea Ordanini
Sep 29Die befreiende Leere im Kleiderschrank
Perspective Daily
The Self-Manipulation of My Pervasive, Perceived Vital Energy through Product Use: An Introspective-Praxis Perspective
Stephen J. Gould
Sep 29How to Vote for President When You Don’t Like the Candidates
The Conversation
Take It or Leave It: How Choosing versus Rejecting Alternatives Affects Information Processing
Tatiana Sokolova, Aradhna Krishna
Sep 27Examining the 5 retail senses
Retail Customer Experience
The Effect of Mere Touch on Perceived Ownership
Joann Peck, Suzanne B. Shu
Sep 20What Business Owners Can Learn from Apple’s Store Makeover
NCR Silver
Turning to Space: Social Density, Social Class, and the Value of Things in Stores
Thomas Clayton O’Guinn, Robin J. Tanner, Ahreum Maeng
Sep 15Tailgating Season Is upon Us
South Bend Tribune
Domesticating Public Space through Ritual: Tailgating as Vestaval
Tonya Williams Bradford, John F. Sherry Jr.
Sep 14Are EVs Not Manly Enough?
Hybrid Cars News
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 12How Framing Sustainability as Strength Can Help Win Male Audiences
Sustainable Brands
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 9Eight Proven Strategies for Better Remote Work
Lifehacker Australia
Is Noise Always Bad? Exploring the Effects of Ambient Noise on Creative Cognition
Ravi Mehta, Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Amar Cheema
Sep 9UM Professor's Research Published in Journal of Consumer Research
University of Mississippi News
Effects of Objective and Evaluative Front-of-Package Cues on Food Evaluation and Choice: The Moderating Influence of Comparative and Noncomparative Processing Contexts
Christopher L. Newman, Elizabeth Howlett, Scot Burton
Sep 7Bill Nye's New Show and Other Sources of Nostalgia
The Manitoban
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
Sep 7Alone Doesn't Always Mean Lonely
The State Press
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Sep 6Survey Shows Men Find Environmentalism 'UnManly'
teleSUR English
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 6En Magasin, Méfiez-Vous du Centre
Le Journal de Montréal
Shining in the Center: Central Gaze Cascade Effect on Product Choice
A. Selin Atalay, H. Onur Bodur, Dina Rasolofoarison
Sep 6Men Avoid 'Green Behaviors' to Preserve Their Macho Image
Treehugger
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 4Men Think Going Green Will Make Them Wimps
Newser
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Sep 4Commentary: Research Shows Recycling's Not Very Manly
Portland Press Herald
Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption
Aaron R. Brough, James E.B. Wilkie, Jingjing Ma, Mathew S. Isaac, David Gal
Browse and Search the Publicity Archive »