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Story ImageInc.
'Fake It Until You Make It' Works--Unless You Make This Mistake
June 15, 2016

A study published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that people who tried to prove their worth to others were more likely to dwell on their shortcomings. Ambitious professionals who wore luxury clothing in an effort to appear successful and MBA students who wore Rolex watches to increase their self-worth ended up feeling like bigger failures.

Perils of Compensatory Consumption: Within-Domain Compensation Undermines Subsequent Self-Regulation
by Monika Lisjak, Andrea Bonezzi, Soo Kim, Derek D. Rucker
Story ImageSky News
Flawed Star Ratings Are 'Misleading Shoppers'
June 14, 2016

Analysis of 300,000 ratings across 1,300 products on Amazon in the US uncovered a "substantial disconnect" between the number of stars awarded by the public and the quality rating given to a product following objective, independent testing. The findings were published in the Journal of Consumer Research.

Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
by Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Story ImageThe Times
Left a Bit, Left a Bit . . . Now Tuck In
June 12, 2016

In a study to be published in the Journal of Consumer Research this month, researchers suggest that right-handed people -- 90% of the population -- subliminally expect sugary treats to be on their dominant side. When this happens their brains have a split second to consider other effects such as their health.

Healthy-Left, Unhealthy-Right: Can Displaying Healthy Items to the Left (versus Right) of Unhealthy Items Nudge Healthier Choices?
by Marisabel Romero, Dipayan Biswas
Story ImageDaily Mail
Why £9.99 Price Tags on Goods Are Turn-off for Women Shoppers: Study Finds Round Numbers Are More Appealing
June 10, 2016

It is the oldest trick in the shopkeeper’s book. But marketing goods at £9.99 might be turning women off parting with their money. A study published in the Journal of Consumer Research suggests round numbers are more appealing to them so adding a penny to the price would actually increase demand.

Numbers Are Gendered
by Dengfeng Yan
Story ImageBicycling
12 Weird Ways to Halt Hunger
June 10, 2016

A lot of people become tense or stressed when a craving comes on, and you're better off trying to channel that tension into your muscles. In a study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, people who tightened their muscles (regardless of which ones) while trying to exert self-control in their food choices were better able to overcome temptations.

From Firm Muscles to Firm Willpower: Understanding the Role of Embodied Cognition in Self-Regulation
by Iris W. Hung, Aparna A. Labroo
Story ImageDigg
Is Technology Stifling Creativity?
June 8, 2016

Last year, Ravi Mehta and Meng Zhu published a study in the Journal of Consumer Research on the link between abundance and creativity. "What we found," said Mehta, "is that abundant resources may have a negative effect on creativity. When you have fewer resources, you use them more creatively."

Creating When You Have Less: The Impact of Resource Scarcity on Product Use Creativity
by Ravi Mehta, Meng Zhu
Story ImageNew York Times
Online Reviews? Researchers Give Them a Low Rating
June 7, 2016

After analyzing 344,157 Amazon ratings of 1,272 products in 120 product categories, researchers who published their study in the Journal of Consumer Research found “a substantial disconnect” between the objective quality information that online reviews actually convey and the extent to which consumers trust them.

Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
by Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Story ImageEntrepreneur
What Gets Shared Online? Depends How You See It
June 3, 2016

When you're launching a business, certainly one way you hope to catch on with customers is through word of mouth. But what is it about a company -- or even a cat video -- that inspires people to click that share button or email that link? According to a recent study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, it's a feeling of ownership that makes a difference in what we decide send out into the world.

How Content Acquisition Method Affects Word of Mouth
by Zoey Chen, Jonah Berger
Story ImageBoston Globe
You Are What Marketers Say You Are
June 2, 2016

As you browse the Internet, many websites try to present you with ads that are tailored to your interests, based on your previous browsing activity. A recent study in the Journal of Consumer Research suggests that such targeting can create a self-fulfilling prophecy. People who thought they had been presented with a targeted ad subsequently identified more strongly with whatever identity (e.g., sophisticated, environmentally friendly, outdoorsy) the ad conveyed, as long as that identity was not totally out of character for the recipient.

An Audience of One: Behaviorally Targeted Ads as Implied Social Labels
by Christopher A. Summers, Robert W. Smith, Rebecca Walker Reczek
Story ImageThe New Yorker
When Products Talk
June 1, 2016

The “personalities” associated with brands can affect us in subtle ways. A 2008 study published in the Journal of Consumer Research by a trio of marketing and psychology scholars found that individuals exposed to the Apple brand were slightly more creative afterward; people exposed to the Disney Channel brand behaved slightly more honestly. Odd as it sounds, there’s a sense in which people treat some of their products as role models.

Automatic Effects of Brand Exposure on Motivated Behavior: How Apple Makes You “Think Different”
by Gráinne M. Fitzsimons, Tanya L. Chartrand, Gavan J. Fitzsimons
Story ImageThe Atlantic
Life Isn’t Fair
June 1, 2016

Our belief in the world’s fairness can veer into magical thinking. A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that people who frequently patronize a business believe they are more likely than other customers to win a given prize drawing by that business -- a phenomenon the researchers called the “lucky loyalty” effect.

Lucky Loyalty: The Effect of Consumer Effort on Predictions of Randomly Determined Marketing Outcomes
by Rebecca Walker Reczek, Kelly L. Haws, Christopher A. Summers
Story ImageBustle
Desktop Digital Assistants in the '90s Annoyed You for a Reason, and Science Has Figured out Why
May 26, 2016

A study published in the Journal of Consumer Research explores why people generally hate cute, animated digital assistants, and the results are pretty fascinating. The biggest takeaway? Sometimes these digital assistants are a little too lifelike, and that can feel patronizing for us computer users.

Anthropomorphized Helpers Undermine Autonomy and Enjoyment in Computer Games
by Sara Kim, Rocky Peng Chen, Ke Zhang
Story ImageNew York
People Hated Clippy Because He Made Them Feel Powerless
May 26, 2016

Clippy, Microsoft Office’s digital assistant, was king of the unwanted question: “It looks like you’re writing a letter. Do you need some help with that?” No, Clippy, I do not need some help with that. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research identified one more reason why that little paper clip sent so many people into rage spirals: Digital assistants tend to make us feel powerless. It’s not just Clippy, in other words — it’s his entire species.

Anthropomorphized Helpers Undermine Autonomy and Enjoyment in Computer Games
by Sara Kim, Rocky Peng Chen, Ke Zhang
Story ImageVocativ
Why You Hated Clippy, That Annoying Microsoft Paperclip
May 21, 2016

Remember Clippy? The know-it-all animated paperclip, who once haunted unfinished Microsoft Office documents across the country, quickly becoming the most despised computer-generated helper. Now, a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research attempts to figure out why we harbor such disdain for Clippy and other human-like digital assistants.

Anthropomorphized Helpers Undermine Autonomy and Enjoyment in Computer Games
by Sara Kim, Rocky Peng Chen, Ke Zhang
Story ImageMedical Daily
Believers in ‘Good Karma’ Refuse Charitable Giving When It Focuses on Personal Gain
May 19, 2016

To create effective ads for a given product, marketers devise “targeted” strategies aimed at specific audiences, which means they need to understand who responds to which promotions. Despite trusting that they will be rewarded for good deeds, karma devotees may not react in a favorable way when incentives are added to charitable donation ads, a new study suggests.

In Pursuit of Good Karma: When Charitable Appeals to Do Right Go Wrong
by Katina Kulow, Thomas Kramer
Story ImageLifehacker
The Power of Going It Alone
May 16, 2016

A study published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that people consistently underestimated how much they’d enjoy seeing a show, going to a museum, seeing a movie, and eating at a restaurant by themselves. This becomes a serious problem when it becomes an automatic response to anything fun you’d like to do. Not only does it restrict your fun, but it gets worse the longer you wait.

Inhibited from Bowling Alone
by Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Story ImageArs Technica
User Ratings Are Unreliable, and We Fail to Account for That
May 6, 2016

User ratings are often a good way to make choices about a purchase, but they come with some inherent weaknesses. For a start, they suffer badly from sampling bias. Review-writers are likely to be people who have had either a very positive or very negative response to a product. And often, only a few people rate a particular product. It turns out people are pretty bad at taking these weaknesses into account when they assess online product ratings, according to a recent paper in the Journal of Consumer Research.

Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
by Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Story ImagePsychology Today
The Power of Merely Requesting a Favor
May 2, 2016

In a recent study published in the Journal of Consumer Research, researchers explored a new social influence strategy based on favors and the norm of reciprocity. Instead of salespeople doing customers a costly favor (additional discount, free accessories), or by getting the consumer to do a small unrelated favor (the Ben Franklin Effect), a salesperson can seal the deal in the negotiation by merely asking for a favor.

The Favor Request Effect: Requesting a Favor from Consumers to Seal the Deal
by Simon J. Blanchard, Kurt A. Carlson, Jamie D. Hyodo
Story ImageYahoo! Finance
Here's the Psychological Reason Most People Overvalue Things They Already Own
April 22, 2016

Recent research suggests that ownership of an item creates a link between that item and our identity. Whether you're involved in a transaction for a mug, a pen, or a car, it helps to be aware of the endowment effect and its influence on our behavior. If you can take a step back and realize why an item is so meaningful to you or to someone else, you may have an easier time negotiating a favorable outcome.

Explaining the Endowment Effect through Ownership
by Sara Loughran Dommer, Vanitha Swaminathan
Story ImageTIME
How Hot Salespeople Affect What You Buy in the Store
April 21, 2016

A new report in the Journal of Consumer Research indicates that sometimes attractive salespeople can be bad for business—and not only because they may have been hired due to their appearance rather than their competence.

Consumer Reactions to Attractive Service Providers: Approach or Avoid?
by Lisa C. Wan, Robert S. Wyer Jr.
Story ImageThe Telegraph
Attractive Salespeople Scare Away Customers, Warn Researchers
April 20, 2016

Employing beautiful or handsome shop assistants to man the tills may appear a foolproof strategy for pulling in customers. But a new study suggests that, in some cases, attractive salespeople can actually scare away shoppers, making them abandon their prospective purchases and flee.

Consumer Reactions to Attractive Service Providers: Approach or Avoid?
by Lisa C. Wan, Robert S. Wyer Jr.
Story ImageConsumerist
Does Paying with Cash Increase Your Emotional Investment in a Purchase?
April 20, 2016

Say you go to the store with a friend and you each buy the same lamp for $150. The only difference is you pay in cash and your pal pays with plastic. The dollar amounts are the same, the purchased product is identical, but a new study finds that your levels of emotional investment in that lamp are likely different. This is according to recent findings in the Journal of Consumer Research.

'Paper or Plastic?': How We Pay Influences Post-Transaction Connection
by Avni M. Shah, Noah Eisenkraft, James R. Bettman, Tanya L. Chartrand
Story ImagePacific Standard
The Benefits of Forging a Personal Connection with that Paper Cup
April 20, 2016

Did you stop at Starbucks on your way to work this morning? If so, when you finished your latte, did you throw away the cup, or recycle it? The answer may turn on the spelling ability of the barista who scribbled your name on it. That’s one of the fascinating findings of a newly published study that reveals a previously unknown, presumably unconscious reason we choose to recycle certain disposable products.

The Recycled Self: Consumers' Disposal Decisions of Identity-Linked Products
by Remi Trudel, Jennifer J. Argo, Matthew D. Meng
Story ImageThe Atlantic
Consumer Reports in the Age of the Amazon Review
April 13, 2016

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research showed that Consumer Reports’s reviews and online user-written reviews differed in important ways. Online reviewers, they found, were more likely to give premium brands higher ratings, and rarely compared a variety of similar devices in the same setting, as Consumer Reports does by default.

Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
by Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Story ImageHarvard Business Review
Targeted Ads Don’t Just Make You More Likely to Buy — They Can Change How You Think About Yourself
April 4, 2016

Thanks to online tracking technology, marketers can deliver ads targeted specifically to individuals based on their behavior online. Recent research in the Journal of Consumer Research explored whether behaviorally targeted ads have unique psychological consequences that help make them more effective than ads that rely on traditional demographic or psychographic targeting.

An Audience of One: Behaviorally Targeted Ads as Implied Social Labels
by Christopher A. Summers, Robert W. Smith, Rebecca Walker Reczek
Story ImageThe Week
Here's How Online Ads Are Screwing with Your Brain
March 31, 2016

The era of targeted online ads is a mixture of convenient and creepy — advertising algorithms now ensure that shortly after you search for a wedding venue, for instance, banner ads for wedding DJs and florists will begin popping up on your screen. But now, a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research suggests that targeted ads may even change how you feel about yourself.

An Audience of One: Behaviorally Targeted Ads as Implied Social Labels
by Christopher A. Summers, Robert W. Smith, Rebecca Walker Reczek
Story ImageFast Company
Virtual Reality, Brand Immersion, and the Power of Making Memories
March 29, 2016

A study in the Journal of Consumer Research found that consumers who touch products in the aisles will not only pay more money for them than those who keep their hands off the merchandise, but that startlingly this held true even for those who were asked only to imagine they had touched the product.

The Effect of Mere Touch on Perceived Ownership
by Joann Peck, Suzanne B. Shu
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Press Releases »
DateNews ItemArticle Mentioned
Jun 15Poll: Are You Swayed By Star Ratings Online?
Shropshire Star
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Jun 14Luxury Marketers Are in the Happiness Business
Should the Devil Sell Prada? Retail Rejection Increases Aspiring Consumers' Desire for the Brand
Morgan K. Ward, Darren W. Dahl
Jun 14Online Shoppers Warned Against Reliance on Star Ratings
Daily Mail
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Jun 12Experts give low rating to online reviews
Deccan Herald
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Jun 9What Happens When People Stop Talking about the Stanford Rape Case?
The Atlantic
The Nature of Slacktivism: How the Social Observability of an Initial Act of Token Support Affects Subsequent Prosocial Action
Kirk Kristofferson, Katherine White, John Peloza
Jun 8Whether Someone Finds or Receives News and Video on Social Media Influences How Closely They'll Read It and and Whether They'll Share It Says University of Miami Study
PR Newswire
How Content Acquisition Method Affects Word of Mouth
Zoey Chen, Jonah Berger
Jun 7Low-Income Earners Deemed Less Deserving to Shop Ethically, Study Finds
University Affairs
Wealth and Welfare: Divergent Moral Reactions to Ethical Consumer Choices
Jenny G. Olson, Brent McFerran, Andrea C. Morales, Darren W. Dahl
Jun 6When Selling Good Karma Goes Bad
In Pursuit of Good Karma: When Charitable Appeals to Do Right Go Wrong
Katina Kulow, Thomas Kramer
Jun 6Do snobbish sales associates lead you to buy more? - Daily Times
Daily Times
Should the Devil Sell Prada? Retail Rejection Increases Aspiring Consumers' Desire for the Brand
Morgan K. Ward, Darren W. Dahl
Jun 45 Proven Hacks to Increase Self-Control - Huffington Post
The Huffington Post
“I Don’t” versus “I Can’t”: When Empowered Refusal Motivates Goal-Directed Behavior
Vanessa M. Patrick, Henrik Hagtvedt
Jun 18 Unexpected Tricks for Losing Weight That Are Backed by Science
D'Marge
Plate Size and Color Suggestibility: The Delboeuf Illusion’s Bias on Serving and Eating Behavior
Koert Van Ittersum, Brian Wansink
May 31Could Too Much Measurement Be Preventing the Delivery of Great Customer Service?
Customer Think
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
May 29Can Tracking Our Hormones Make Us Smarter with Money?
Singularity Hub
Do Payment Mechanisms Change the Way Consumers Perceive Products?
Promothesh Chatterjee, Randall L. Rose
May 23Will Digital Content Overload Kill Our Love for Nostalgia?
The Content Standard by Skyword
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
May 19Heads Up: Should Political Candidates Care Where Slogans Appear on Campaign Posters?
PRWeb
Positioning Rationality and Emotion: Rationality Is Up and Emotion Is Down
Luca Cian, Aradhna Krishna, Norbert Schwarz
May 19Does the Shape of a Company's Logo Matter?
PRWeb
Does Your Company Have the Right Logo? How and Why Circular- and Angular-Logo Shapes Influence Brand Attribute Judgments
Yuwei Jiang, Gerald J. Gorn, Maria Galli, Amitava Chattopadhyay
May 16How consumers' beliefs about karma influence their response to charitable appeals in advertising
The Hans India
In Pursuit of Good Karma: When Charitable Appeals to Do Right Go Wrong
Katina Kulow, Thomas Kramer
May 15When selling good karma goes bad
University of California News
In Pursuit of Good Karma: When Charitable Appeals to Do Right Go Wrong
Katina Kulow, Thomas Kramer
May 13How We're Being Sold Nostalgia
BBC News
Nostalgia Weakens the Desire for Money
Jannine D. Lasaleta, Constantine Sedikides, Kathleen D. Vohs
May 13When Selling Good Karma Goes Bad
Science Daily
In Pursuit of Good Karma: When Charitable Appeals to Do Right Go Wrong
Katina Kulow, Thomas Kramer
May 10Study: User rates offer little correlation to quality
The Business Times of Western Colorado
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
May 4If I Ask for a Favor, Will You Buy?
The Huffington Post
The Favor Request Effect: Requesting a Favor from Consumers to Seal the Deal
Simon J. Blanchard, Kurt A. Carlson, Jamie D. Hyodo
May 4Be a Yoga-tarian: Ashtanga Yoga
Gulf News
The Influence of Base Rate and Case Information on Health Risk Perceptions: A Unified Model of Self-Positivity and Self-Negativity
Dengfeng Yan, Jaideep Sengupta
May 3Online user ratings are misleading. Do not rely on them while shopping
Catch News
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
May 3CONTACT 13: Don't Believe Every Review When Shopping Online
KTNV Las Vegas
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
May 2Online shoppers, don't go by those product ratings
Times of India
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
May 2Self-Diagnosis Is a Dangerous Practice
Gulf News
The Influence of Base Rate and Case Information on Health Risk Perceptions: A Unified Model of Self-Positivity and Self-Negativity
Dengfeng Yan, Jaideep Sengupta
May 2Online User Ratings Not Good Indicators of Product Quality: Study
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Apr 29Need Willpower? Clench Up
Seeker
From Firm Muscles to Firm Willpower: Understanding the Role of Embodied Cognition in Self-Regulation
Iris W. Hung, Aparna A. Labroo
Apr 28When online shopping, maybe you don't want the stars to be your guide
Denver Post
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Apr 28When Online Shopping, Maybe You Don't Want the Stars to Be Your Guide
Denver Post
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Apr 28Consumers' Trust in Online User Ratings Misplaced, Says Study
Science Daily
Navigating by the Stars: Investigating the Actual and Perceived Validity of Online User Ratings
Bart de Langhe, Philip M. Fernbach, Donald R. Lichtenstein
Apr 27Study Tracks Perceptions of Making Ethical Purchases
EurekAlert!
Wealth and Welfare: Divergent Moral Reactions to Ethical Consumer Choices
Jenny G. Olson, Brent McFerran, Andrea C. Morales, Darren W. Dahl
Apr 25Want to Succeed in Retail? Hire Ugly People
Yahoo! Parenting
Consumer Reactions to Attractive Service Providers: Approach or Avoid?
Lisa C. Wan, Robert S. Wyer Jr.
Apr 25If Your Favorite Brand Is Sincere, Is Innovation What You Expect?
Science Daily
Too Exciting to Fail, Too Sincere to Succeed: The Effects of Brand Personality on Sensory Disconfirmation
Aparna Sundar, Theodore J. Noseworthy
Apr 23Healthy Eating Trick: Use Tech to Order Food
Fox News iMag
The Effect of Preference Expression Modality on Self-Control
Anne-Kathrin Klesse, Jonathan Levav, Caroline Goukens
Apr 218 Surprisingly Calming Things to Do Alone
Bustle
Inhibited from Bowling Alone
Rebecca K. Ratner, Rebecca W. Hamilton
Apr 8Psychology of Valentine's Day Gifts
GotScience.org
Overindividuation in Gift Giving: Shopping for Multiple Recipients Leads Givers to Choose Unique but Less Preferred Gifts
Mary Steffel, Robyn A. LeBoeuf
Apr 8How the Meat Industry Exploits Toxic Masculinity
AlterNet
Is Meat Male? A Quantitative Multimethod Framework to Establish Metaphoric Relationships
Paul Rozin, Julia M. Hormes, Myles S. Faith, Brian Wansink
Apr 6Self-Perception May Be Stronger than Relevance When Targeting Ads Communications
MediaPost
An Audience of One: Behaviorally Targeted Ads as Implied Social Labels
Christopher A. Summers, Robert W. Smith, Rebecca Walker Reczek
Apr 6How Targeted Ads Could Affect Our Self-Esteem and Make Us Better People
Business Insider
An Audience of One: Behaviorally Targeted Ads as Implied Social Labels
Christopher A. Summers, Robert W. Smith, Rebecca Walker Reczek
Mar 30Learn to Love Goal-Setting (Yes, Really!)
Payscale
Attaining Satisfaction
Cecile K. Cho, Gita Venkataramani Johar
Mar 30The Trump Effect: Nobody Loves a Braggart until Everybody Does
Vocativ
When Boastful Word of Mouth Helps versus Hurts Social Perceptions and Persuasion
Grant Packard, Andrew D. Gershoff, David B. Wooten
Mar 29Trackers May Curb the Joy of Activities
Albuquerque Journal
The Hidden Cost of Personal Quantification
Jordan Etkin
Mar 29Here Are 4 Simple Ways to Trick Your Stomach into Feeling Full
Mic
The Influence of Bite Size on Quantity of Food Consumed: A Field Study
Arul Mishra, Himanshu Mishra, Tamara M. Masters
Mar 28Can Spending Money on Others Be Good for Your Health?
TODAY
The Exception Is the Rule: Underestimating and Overspending on Exceptional Expenses
Abigail B. Sussman, Adam L. Alter
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